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High all, I just installed an LED rear blinker system on my 2012 high ball. I know that people sell load equalizers for $30+ and I know that all it is, is a resistor which I could get at radio shack for a buck. My question is, does anyone know what Ohm resistors to get?


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There is a reason why the load equalizers are the better way to go, even though they cost more. Resistors will put out significant heat, which can likely melt any plastic they will come in contact with, including any wire insulation they might touch or come close enough to.

That being said, if you're still willing to save money and go the resistor way, I would suggest an 8ohm, 20 or 25 watt resistor for each side.
 

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There is a reason why the load equalizers are the better way to go, even though they cost more. Resistors will put out significant heat, which can likely melt any plastic they will come in contact with, including any wire insulation they might touch or come close enough to.

That being said, if you're still willing to save money and go the resistor way, I would suggest an 8ohm, 20 or 25 watt resistor for each side.
http://www.matstrad.com/resistors_tech.php
 

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There is a reason why the load equalizers are the better way to go, even though they cost more. Resistors will put out significant heat, which can likely melt any plastic they will come in contact with, including any wire insulation they might touch or come close enough to.

That being said, if you're still willing to save money and go the resistor way, I would suggest an 8ohm, 20 or 25 watt resistor for each side.
I purchased a set of these, do you think they will be too hot or will the sinks on them dissipate well enough?

 

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I purchased a set of these, do you think they will be too hot or will the sinks on them dissipate well enough?

Just mount them somewhere where they're aired well (not buried in the headlight bucket, or some other nook) and check on them to see how hot they get to the touch. thumb up
 

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Just mount them somewhere where they're aired well (not buried in the headlight bucket, or some other nook) and check on them to see how hot they get to the touch. thumb up
I'm going to use them with the tails. I imagine there should be a place there to put them. Still waiting on the actual tails, so I haven't done anything yet.
 

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I purchased a set of these, do you think they will be too hot or will the sinks on them dissipate well enough?
...
Their rated to handle over twice as many watts then what could be used in this application. A little air flow should keep them cool enough.

12 volts / 6 Ohms = 2 amps
2 amps x 12v = 24 watts

Those resisters are rated for 50 watts.
 

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Just mount them somewhere where they're aired well (not buried in the headlight bucket, or some other nook) and check on them to see how hot they get to the touch. thumb up
I test fitted these with the new flush led turn signals the other day. The signals flash fast without. The seller said to put them parallel in the circuit. Installed this way the light flashes once, then doesn't flash again. Reversing the wiring produces no flash. I'm kind of wondering why they're not in series with either the positive or negative side of the light. So:

black wire on harness ----- black wire on resistor -----black wire on signal--
blue wire on signal ---- white wire on resistor ---- blue wire on harness.

or

black wire on harness ---- entire resistor --- light --- back to blue wire on harness

or

black wire on harness ----light--- entire resistor --- back to blue wire on harness
 

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Wow... poor advice all around.

Get a pair of these http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2062288 for all four turn signals replaced with LEDs

Or a pair of 10watt 10ohm may work for just front or rears replaced with LEDs

You can tape them together with electrical tape or heat shrink, and twist together two of the ends into a single wound lead, and TAP or attach to ground. Take each of the two free leads and TAP (not splice) to each left and right blinker circuits. Left is the blue, and right is the blue with red stripe. They do NOT run in parallel with each blinker! They handle the entire left and right side of the bike, front to back! The best place to put them is under the seat. Find the wiring harness leading OUT of the ACM (auto cancel module) and locate the aforementioned left/right leads.... it's really pretty simple.

There are TONS of threads on this on other sites....
 

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Wow... poor advice all around.
Really? I think telling someone to tape wires together with electrical tape, on a motorcycle is as poor advice as one could give. :ltr:

... The seller said to put them parallel in the circuit. ...
Parallel is correct. thumb up Connect the resistor parallel to the two wires from the LED turn signal lights using T-Tap.

black wire on harness ----- black wire on resistor -----black wire on signal--
blue wire on signal ---- white wire on resistor ---- blue wire on harness.
Yes, that's the right way. thumb up
 

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So MBW's splices the two yellow wires to the positive leads of the rear taillights, and the black wire goes to ground?
Well, yes, and no.... no splicing (which implies a cut). They are tapped onto the left and right positive signal wires. Because the the front left and rear left are in series, the load will be drawn per side, not just front or back.
 
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