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Hello to all. I recently bought a beautiful 2000 V92C. What a nice bike it is. When I ride and use the brakes as normal, I become aware of severe fade on the real brake. When I check, the rotor is very hot, much hotter than the front. After cooling down, a view of the pads still installed showed like new thickness. The real wheel spins, but not completely freely. It moves easily, but stops when I stop pushing. While spinning the wheel, I can apply the brakes, and they stop the wheel, and release. I do notice (sometimes) a creak or groan from the caliper when the brake are applied and released. Another test ride has the same problem. Here are my questions. How freely should a rear wheel spin, with the drive belt in place? Is this a caliper release problem? It seems that new calipers are not out there. I have found a rebuild kit on Ebay. Any thoughts are appreciated. I did flush and bleed the brake, also.
 

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I have a friend who had the same problem. Turns out he was riding the brake pedal. When I told him that, he denied it. I told him to pay attention and sho nuff, he was on the brake ever so lightly, but on it.
FYI, The rear brake is for hard stops in concert with the fronts and trail braking in the twisties ONLY....IMO. I never wear out rear pads. Really.
 

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Perhaps the rear pads are new and just haven't seated yet?
 

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You might want to check to see if the pads have glazed over. If they have, lay sandpaper on a flat surface and give 'em a few strokes. Be sure to clean off the grit. Spray some brake parts cleaner on a cloth and wipe off the disc on both sides while the pads are out. If there's glazing on the disc, clean it with a green Scotchbrite pad and then wipe with brake parts cleaner.
I'm 80 and have had a lot more practice at screwing up.
 

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3 other things that will cause that.
Brake master cylinder completely full. No room for expansion as the brake system comes up to temperature.

Brakes that are not bled properly. The caliper pistons will not pull back when the pedal is released because there is air in the system.
The cure is to bleed the brakes again.

The other thing is sticking pistons. Pull the caliper, pull the pads and push the pedal while watching the pistons.
If one is hanging up, not moving out that is your problem.
Depending on the construction of the caliper, you may have to remove the outer rubber dust seal if it has one them, then wash the pistons off with chlorinated brake cleaner. Most calipers now days don't have the rubber dust covers. The ones in this video are pretty typical of ones without dust seals. If this caliper had a dust seal, you would see a rubber boot behind the pad that snapped into a grove in the piston and a groove in the caliper housing. There would be a small retainer. Remove the boot to access the piston.
Here is a video that gives you the basic idea of what I am describing.
Start by washing as much crud as you can out.
When I do it I take the pads out. Then I use a piece of metal about 1/4" thick, couple of wooden door shims back to back etc to work out the pistons that are sticky. I block the pistons that do want to move so that they can't move. This will force the stuck pistons to move when you apply pressure to the pedal.


Wash everything out good. Try it. Block the pistons that move freely to force the stuck ones to move. Wash the crud out of the stuck ones, repeat. Push the pistons back in some if you need to being careful not to damage them.
When everything is moving freely all is good. If you still don't see the pistons retract a little when you let off the pedal you have air in the system or the brake fluid has too much water in it and needs to be changed.

Chlorinated brake cleaner is nasty stuff, for this use it works far better than the non chlorinated type. Wear rubber gloves and have plenty of ventilation, as in push the bike outside. That stuff will shorten your life if your not careful and it will do it very quickly.
So beware. Don't breath it and don't get it on you or your bike. As you work the pistons out while cleaning them keep an eye on your brake fluid level so that you do not run the master-cylinder empty and pump air into the system. That would suck. If you end up adding fluid to the mastercylinder be sure to keep an eye on the level as you push the pistons back in to reassemble it or you will over flow the reservoir.
When your all done remove any fluid above the full mark on the reservoir so the brake fluid has room to expand in use.


Hope that helps.
 

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3 other things that will cause that.
Brake master cylinder completely full. No room for expansion as the brake system comes up to temperature.

Brakes that are not bled properly. The caliper pistons will not pull back when the pedal is released because there is air in the system.
The cure is to bleed the brakes again.

The other thing is sticking pistons. Pull the caliper, pull the pads and push the pedal while watching the pistons.
If one is hanging up, not moving out that is your problem.
Depending on the construction of the caliper, you may have to remove the outer rubber dust seal if it has one them, then wash the pistons off with chlorinated brake cleaner. Most calipers now days don't have the rubber dust covers. The ones in this video are pretty typical of ones without dust seals. If this caliper had a dust seal, you would see a rubber boot behind the pad that snapped into a grove in the piston and a groove in the caliper housing. There would be a small retainer. Remove the boot to access the piston.
Here is a video that gives you the basic idea of what I am describing.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=csLVVDA5YXk
Start by washing as much crud as you can out.
When I do it I take the pads out. Then I use a piece of metal about 1/4" thick, couple of wooden door shims back to back etc to work out the pistons that are sticky. I block the pistons that do want to move so that they can't move. This will force the stuck pistons to move when you apply pressure to the pedal.


Wash everything out good. Try it. Block the pistons that move freely to force the stuck ones to move. Wash the crud out of the stuck ones, repeat. Push the pistons back in some if you need to being careful not to damage them.
When everything is moving freely all is good. If you still don't see the pistons retract a little when you let off the pedal you have air in the system or the brake fluid has too much water in it and needs to be changed.

Chlorinated brake cleaner is nasty stuff, for this use it works far better than the non chlorinated type. Wear rubber gloves and have plenty of ventilation, as in push the bike outside. That stuff will shorten your life if your not careful and it will do it very quickly.
So beware. Don't breath it and don't get it on you or your bike. As you work the pistons out while cleaning them keep an eye on your brake fluid level so that you do not run the master-cylinder empty and pump air into the system. That would suck. If you end up adding fluid to the mastercylinder be sure to keep an eye on the level as you push the pistons back in to reassemble it or you will over flow the reservoir.
When your all done remove any fluid above the full mark on the reservoir so the brake fluid has room to expand in use.


Hope that helps.
Sound advice there Joe.
 

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@MarkWhisenant let us know what you find, some GOOD advice here.....

Side note if there would be air in your rear caliper , then when you ride and the caliper gets hot, it will even push 1 side out more then the other... Then when the brakes cool down there would be less "drag"

All the guys have some solid advice that is easy to follow...

PS did you download the shopmanual already?

Andre using TaPaTaLk
 

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I have a friend who had the same problem. Turns out he was riding the brake pedal. When I told him that, he denied it. I told him to pay attention and sho nuff, he was on the brake ever so lightly, but on it.
FYI, The rear brake is for hard stops in concert with the fronts and trail braking in the twisties ONLY....IMO. I never wear out rear pads. Really.
The rear is also heavily used for slow parking lot stuff. Major key in conquering the cones.
 

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The easiest way to see if the caliper is dragging. Go for a test ride and be sure NOT to touch the rear brake. If the disc is hot when you check it, then you have a problem.

Cheers, Tim
 

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The easiest way to see if the caliper is dragging. Go for a test ride and be sure NOT to touch the rear brake. If the disc is hot when you check it, then you have a problem.

Cheers, Tim
Good idea, just don't grab the rotor to see if it's hot cos by the time you feel the pain your fingers will be burnt!
Don't ask me how I know.....
 

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Good idea, just don't grab the rotor to see if it's hot cos by the time you feel the pain your fingers will be burnt!

Don't ask me how I know.....


What I'll do is lick my fingers and quickly 'tap' the rotor. If it sizzles, it's hot!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Hence my mentioning trail braking.

"trail braking in the twisties ONLY....IMO."

I didn't get slow speed maneuvers from that.

You must have some fun parking lots. Lol!
 

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"trail braking in the twisties ONLY....IMO."

I didn't get slow speed maneuvers from that.

You must have some fun parking lots. Lol!
We have some pretty technical roads out here, some with very tight switchbacks. Trail braking (a very light touch on the rear brake) helps to stabilize the bike. I learned to do that when riding in the Alps and Dolomites with a group of Germans. Hardly a parking lot, eh?
 

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We have some pretty technical roads out here, some with very tight switchbacks. Trail braking (a very light touch on the rear brake) helps to stabilize the bike. I learned to do that when riding in the Alps and Dolomites with a group of Germans. Hardly a parking lot, eh?
I know what trail braking is and use it.

You stated in your opinion the rear brake was only for trail braking in the twisties and in front and rear braking in concert.

That does not include slow maneuvers like a cone course which the rear brake is invaluable. I was just adding slow maneuvers to the list of uses for the rear brake.

I use a ton of rear brake and usually go through rear pads as fast as I do tires.

As fun as twisties are I enjoy slow technical stuff more.
 
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