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WTF!!!! Sounds like you have a short somewhere. Your brake lines are acting as an electricity conductor. I'd be afraid to hook up that battery until I found it!
 

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Discussion Starter #22
It sure seems to me that the brake line is acting like a fuseable link! I'm going to mess around some more but almost thinking I could jury rig an in-line fuse holder with some wires attached to opposite ends of the burnt lines & see what happens.
Does anyone know how much current would be drawn off the battery with everything shut off on a normal bike?
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I am guessing a dead short somewhere too. I would start with checking both connections where the brake line connects to. That should tell you which side the short is coming from. And then trace from there. I am off work after 2 during the week. If you want, I could come take a look with you and see if I can help. At worst it would just be two idiots staring at it.

P.S.- I would guess that it has something to do with the starter, since that should be the only thing carrying the kind of high voltage that can generate that much heat that fast.
Rick: PM sent
 

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It sure seems to me that the brake line is acting like a fuseable link! I'm going to mess around some more but almost thinking I could jury rig an in-line fuse holder with some wires attached to opposite ends of the burnt lines & see what happens.
Does anyone know how much current would be drawn off the battery with everything shut off on a normal bike?
I believe it is around 20 milliamps.
 

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Had the same thing happen to a mustang I owned years ago. The starter solenoid seized and welded itself closed and the result was all of my electrical wiring going up in flames

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

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It sure seems to me that the brake line is acting like a fuseable link! I'm going to mess around some more but almost thinking I could jury rig an in-line fuse holder with some wires attached to opposite ends of the burnt lines & see what happens.
Does anyone know how much current would be drawn off the battery with everything shut off on a normal bike?
Not sure why your intent on hooking up power with a short, you already tried that after installing new parts. What different outcome are you expecting?
DepotPicker gave you the info you need, you most likely have the main power going down and contacting a brake line somewhere, the battery wire would have a rubbed spot where the copper is making contact with the brake line.
But to answer your question, the amperage or current would be whatever the total amperage of the battery is, or more than enough to burn your bike to the ground!
By hooking up a fuse and some wires what is it you are going to do with those?
 

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It sure seems to me that the brake line is acting like a fuseable link! I'm going to mess around some more but almost thinking I could jury rig an in-line fuse holder with some wires attached to opposite ends of the burnt lines & see what happens.
Does anyone know how much current would be drawn off the battery with everything shut off on a normal bike?
I get where you are going.

Here might be another way to accomplish the same thing. Leave your battery out.
Remove the brake line. That should break the circuit you have that is causing the heating. Then take a meter and connect one lead to the positive battery wire.
Then ohm on a low scale to the two banjo bolts or the threads they fit into of where the brake line connected.
If you have continuity to one or the other you know that that brake component has somehow become hot and you can work your way back to where the connection to the positive side of the battery has taken place.

How that for safe?
 

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Yes Joe, that's the same thing I suggested in the beginning of the thread. He got it down to one of four wires, provided he did all this correctly
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Joe: sounds like your idea might work. But here is the latest: I reinstalled the battery after double checking everything. However, my plan was to see if I get a spark when hooking up the negative cable, as that would indicate something is drawing current. Current me if I'm wrong but the standard load of 20 miiliamps I don't think would create a noticeable spark. Anyway, with all the out-feed wires disconnected from the power distribution block & only the positive cable going to the starter solenoid, I still get a bit of a spark. I then disconnected the starter out wire & am finding that the starter itself reeds direct to ground. Is this a normal reading thru the field could circuit? Funny thing is, the solenoid itself is not shorted & even with the starter disconnected, still get a small spark when hooking up the negative cable to the battery.
 

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Joe: sounds like your idea might work. But here is the latest: I reinstalled the battery after double checking everything. However, my plan was to see if I get a spark when hooking up the negative cable, as that would indicate something is drawing current. Current me if I'm wrong but the standard load of 20 miiliamps I don't think would create a noticeable spark. Anyway, with all the out-feed wires disconnected from the power distribution block & only the positive cable going to the starter solenoid, I still get a bit of a spark. I then disconnected the starter out wire & am finding that the starter itself reeds direct to ground. Is this a normal reading thru the field could circuit? Funny thing is, the solenoid itself is not shorted & even with the starter disconnected, still get a small spark when hooking up the negative cable to the battery.
20 miliamps will create a spark but not the type to remove metal etc. You would not hear a snap etc unless you have excellent hearing. But there will be light visible.

The starter itself alone will read grounded at the single bolt that the wire from the solenoid attaches to. There is no field on the victory starters they are permanent magnet motors. That terminal goes to the brushes and armature. (just info).
The solenoid should read open . No continuity across the two largest terminals. That is the switch that controls the starter electrically.
While your there inspect the solenoid posts for a possible pit caused by something shorting onto the battery side of it. ( I am wondering if perhaps something like a part of the brake system moves onto one of the battery or the battery side solenoid terminal when the bike is in a different position than when it is on the lift. Does the other end of that brake line head to the rear of the bike or to the handlebar master cylinder?? causing a exposed metal piece on the brake line to swing, possibly onto a energized terminal or stud when the bars move?).
 

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If you have the starter wire off the starter, not the solenoid wire, now I'm assuming they are wired same as cars,
Leave the battery positive off and take your ohm meter test starter wire to clean metal or negative cable at battery side
You should be open now, if you see any kind of connectivity there's your short, if no short to ground then either that's the wrong wire causing your problem, or moving the wires to disconnect may have corrected the issue for a short period, or what am I missing...
 

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IMG_5739.jpg

Look close, see that screw that's pointed at the starter solenoid, if that battery cable is loose then we get fire.
That's the type of thing you should be looking for, this was from my XCT.
****, I wish I hadn't seen that
 

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Just a thought. Have you checked to see that the negative grounding side of the system is still intact?
Starter draws over 250 amps. If there was something seriously wrong with the ground side of the wiring all the power flowing from the negative side of the battery would be routed through abnormal routes. Whatever was left that would make the connection. Since there is no obvious shorted spot you can find you might want to check that all the bonding and connections for ground still are intact.

Just a thought.
 

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View attachment 208314

Look close, see that screw that's pointed at the starter solenoid, if that battery cable is loose then we get fire.
That's the type of thing you should be looking for, this was from my XCT.
****, I wish I hadn't seen that
Yeah our XR and XC are scary tight in there too. I remember saying a few cuss words when I saw that while rebuilding the Wifey's starter. Wonder if the Vision is better or worse?
 

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Haven't looked close at one to know but I'd bet it's something like this
 

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View attachment 208314

Look close, see that screw that's pointed at the starter solenoid, if that battery cable is loose then we get fire.
That's the type of thing you should be looking for, this was from my XCT.
****, I wish I hadn't seen that
Could you orient me, regarding that pic? I don't have a clue where the starter is, what part of the bike that that's showing.

Thanks.
 

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Could you orient me, regarding that pic? I don't have a clue where the starter is, what part of the bike that that's showing.

Thanks.
And I left it oriented wrong as well.
Bill that's right behind the chin fairing
 

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And I left it oriented wrong as well.
Bill that's right behind the chin fairing
Argh, you mean old-guy me has to get down on the ground, and look up?

Hey, thanks for the help.
 

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After thinking about this on an off today, and then what you posted this evening I would recommend that you try the test I describe in this post.
I think it is what I asked you to try earlier but I didn't really explain why very well so I included an explanation at the very end.

Remove that brake line that burst into flames and put a 12v test light in place of it. I use a set of jumpers like these for that.https://www.amazon.com/Generic-3feet-Double-Alligator-Jumper/dp/B01JLN70PE/ref=sr_1_2?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1488856315&sr=1-2&keywords=alligator+jumper+cables and this is the sort of test light I mean.
https://www.amazon.com/Generic-3feet-Double-Alligator-Jumper/dp/B01JLN70PE/ref=sr_1_2?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1488856315&sr=1-2&keywords=alligator+jumper+cables

Now you have a light bulb that takes the place of your brake line.



Then you have to find a limited current 12 volt power source. Two choices I can think of. Use a manual battery charger with short circuit protection no larger than 10 amps in place of your battery. If it trips the internal circuit breaker when hooked up correctly stop.

Lacking a small manual battery charger buy an inline fuse holder and hook it to the positive terminal of your battery with a 5 amp fuse in it and then hook the other end of the fused line to the regular positive battery lead. Buy a couple of boxes of extra fuses, save the receipt and take back what you don't use.

Hook the battery with the 5 amp fuse inline up to the battery cables without the test light hooked up across the brake components. (disconnect the test light for a moment) See if the 5 amp fuse holds. If not stop.

If the fuse holds hook the light up across the fittings that the brake line attached to.
If the light illuminates you still have current flow and a fault somewhere. If the light doesn't illuminate double check that the light works. If your sure the light is working the fault has cleared and you will have to try to recreate the fault before you can find it.

EDIT. Resist turning the key on during this because the head light, fuel pump and tail light draw will blow the fuse.



Here is my reasoning. You have an unusual problem or you probably would have found it by now.
You would have spotted some loose terminal up against part of the brake system etc. You sound like you know what you are looking for and all.

What you need to do now is find out where you really are. Or what we really know at this point.
If that brake line was still on there would there still be current flowing though it? We need to know that.
This is what this test does. If you don't have a test light turn your meter to DC volts and look for voltage either negative or positive across where that brake line hooked up with the battery fused at low amperage hooked up (or the battery charger). I personally like the bulb because it goes out when you clear the fault and unlike a digital meter you don't have to be staring directly at it to see it momentarily drop out when you are wiggling things etc.



That is what I would do at this point.
I won't be hurt if you don't do it that way.
 

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Argh, you mean old-guy me has to get down on the ground, and look up?

Hey, thanks for the help.
Ha, not all the way Bill.
Was on the right side, on my knees looking in the opening above the rear brake reservoir.
Look with a flashlight, you'll see em

Knees creaked and cracked all the way back up 😀
 
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