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Discussion Starter #1
My wife and I each have a 2012 Vic XCT. The voltage gauge on my bike reads about 14.2 volts as I'm cruising down the road. On my wife's bike, the voltage gauge reads about 16.1. This is just barely into the red "danger" zone on the gauge. Other than this gauge reading, her bike runs perfectly.

Is this likely just a miscalibrated gauge or is something likely wrong with her electrical system? I can understand that a weak battery, too much power draw, a weak alternator, etc could all cause a low voltage but what could cause a high voltage on a bike?

Any recommendations on how to test this? I have a multi-meter. With the bike running could I just connect the probes of the multimeter to any hot wire and the ground to get a voltage reading? I could use the accessory port on the fairing. Should this reading match the voltage at the gauge?

If this is simply a gauge problem, is it possible to calibrate or adjust the reading on this analog gauge?

Thanks for any help you can offer.

G'day,

Vinish
 

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There is another thread that I have been updating.

Long story short my XC is in the shop for stuttering issues. One of the things both I and the service team noticed was the voltage gauge on mine is right at the red line (high voltage) and my bike dies.

The service team has yet to confirm what they have found but they believed that the issue might be caused by the voltage regulator drawing too much power which has caused an issue with the fuel pump.

I'm not saying your wife's bike will have the same issue but it may be worth talking to your local service dept and have them verify everything is fine.
 

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My wife and I each have a 2012 Vic XCT. The voltage gauge on my bike reads about 14.2 volts as I'm cruising down the road. On my wife's bike, the voltage gauge reads about 16.1. This is just barely into the red "danger" zone on the gauge. Other than this gauge reading, her bike runs perfectly.
Really Vin, do you even have to ask :rolleyes:......She's obviously hotter than you.
 

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You can check the voltage at any point on the bike were you can get a connection to a live circuit. Use a digital meter for accuracy. Check with engine off and with it on.

What does the on board meter show when the bike is not running? If possible, find a connection that is hot without the key switch on. That way you will not have the lighting pulling the voltage down. It will be true battery voltage.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Excellent ideas. I am leaving on a business trip and will not be back until late Saturday so I will look into this Sunday. Thanks.

G'day,

Vinish
 

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with meter your battery should read 12.2 your amp gauge should say the same thing. With a wrench check your battery bolts. Now start bike and your meter should read 14.2 same with amp gauge. Now if your at 16 your regulator is not doing its job. You can do a voltage check on the regulator.
BBOB here has service manual you can down load.

Do not ride the bike or start the bike over and over it will coast you a lot of money. If you do it to much you'll burn up the regulator the battery and you can take out the stator.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
More excellent advice. I will look into this hopefully on Sunday. I already have the shop manual.

G'day,

Vinish
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Sorry for the delay. I have had a busy two weeks of business travel. I conducted several measurements this morning and here are the results. All readings are with a digital multi-meter unless otherwise indicated.

My 2012 Vic XCT
-With bike running, the voltage gausge on the dash reads about 14.5 - a bit below the red line of 16 volts
Following were measured at unswitched fairing power port:
-Bike off = 12.87 v
-Bike turned on but not yet running = 12.19 v
-During starting of bike = bounced around but about 11.0 v
-Bike running = 14.56 v


Wife's 2012 Vic XCT - Bike with possible problem
-With bike running, the voltage gausge on the dash reads about 16.1 - a bit above the red line of 16 volts
Following were measured at unswitched fairing power port:
-Bike off = 12.98 v
-Bike turned on but not yet running = 12.30 v
-During starting of bike = bounced around but about 11.2 v
-Bike running = 16.03 v

This seems to confirm a problem with her bike having too high a voltage while running. Are there any suggestions for what might be causing this? Thanks in advance for any help you can offer.

I plan to read the sections of the service manual related to the voltage regulator later today.

G'day,

Vinish
 

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Wife's 2012 Vic XCT - Bike with possible problem
I think you've confirmed the bike does have a problem, its not just a possible problem, it's for real.

I'd suspect the regulator itself. Putting out too little or too much is controlled by the regulator.
 

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A fully charged battery, no load will be 12.6 volts which is considered 100% state of charge. If battery has been charged (running vehicle, battery charger, etc.) turn on a light load for 30 seconds to one minute to remove surface charge before testing state of charge. Ambient temperature will have some effect of state of charge. A state of charge test will not tell the whole story.
Confirm all connections and circuits are good including those at the battery using a voltage drop test, as connections can and do cause alot of electrical issues. Any and all electrical issues should start at the battery and connections. The vehicle battery is very important as it stabilizes system voltage and yes, if battery is defective it may allow voltage of charging system to exceed voltage regulator setting. A conductance test is now recommended test for most batteries, especially AGM type batteries. Confirm battery is good with a true battery test before any other charging/starting test. If battery and connections test good then proceed with charging system test. Charging system voltage (regulator setting) should be between 13 to 14.6 volts.
Google voltage drop test, there are some good videos on procedures and with a inexpensive digital multimeter you can do these test!

Hope this helps, Until next time------ride!!!
 

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A fully charged battery, no load will be 12.6 volts which is considered 100% state of charge. If battery has been charged (running vehicle, battery charger, etc.) turn on a light load for 30 seconds to one minute to remove surface charge before testing state of charge. Ambient temperature will have some effect of state of charge. A state of charge test will not tell the whole story.
Confirm all connections and circuits are good including those at the battery using a voltage drop test, as connections can and do cause alot of electrical issues. Any and all electrical issues should start at the battery and connections. The vehicle battery is very important as it stabilizes system voltage and yes, if battery is defective it may allow voltage of charging system to exceed voltage regulator setting. A conductance test is now recommended test for most batteries, especially AGM type batteries. Confirm battery is good with a true battery test before any other charging/starting test. If battery and connections test good then proceed with charging system test. Charging system voltage (regulator setting) should be between 13 to 14.6 volts.
Google voltage drop test, there are some good videos on procedures and with a inexpensive digital multimeter you can do these test!

Hope this helps, Until next time------ride!!!
One simple test you can do that wouldn't cost anything is to swap the batteries between the bikes. If it's a bad battery the problem will move along with the battery to the other bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
More good ideas. Thanks. It will take me a while to do these tests. Darn that day job...always getting in the way of my fun.

G'day,

Vinish
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Okay, folks. I finally got to do all the tests in the service manual. I could do all the tests except the one that involved a 12 v shunt. I could not do that one because I do not own a 12 v shunt. In any case, that is primarily a test for the battery which is not giving me any problems. I also swapped batteries between bikes and it did not change the problem of high voltage.

I checked all the connections and did all the rectifier/regulator tests and the rect/reg tests out fine. However, the voltage on the bike when running is 16.1 v. Then I had a good idea. As the proud owner of his and hers 2012 Vic XCT, why not switch the rect/reg from my bike which has the proper voltage to hers. I did this and now my bike has a voltage of 16.1 volts and her bike has a good 14.5 volts. So this brings me to my next questions.

If the rect/reg passes all the tests but delivers a voltage of 16.1 v, should it be replaced or is it just running a little high without any negaive impact? What, if any, are the potential impacts of running the bike with a rect/reg that delivers 16.1 v?

Thanks for any further advice you can offer.

Dang, just found the part - Victory # 4012717 - $196 - Ouch

G'day,

Vinish
 

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Charging system running that high of voltage will definitely reduce the life of the battery. No battery can with stand that high of consistent voltage and survive.
 

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I would not run it. 16+ volts is just too high. You can shorten the life of other components...replace the defective part.
 

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Your voltage regulator will get worst if not replaced, and the voltage will increase. Even now, your Voltage gauge will not catch and display all the voltage spikes that come off the bad regulator. You will likely destroy the battery, and have the potential to fry other components, including the all mighty and all too expensive ECU.

Voltage regulators go out more than any other part on these bikes (or so it seems to me), so I would promptly replace it without riding the bike until done so.
 
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