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How do I go about doing this? I have been riding for apprx 4 yrs to date.So i do not have any experience on this matter. I want to ride from RI to the Grand Canyon and tour a little more of our great country on the ride back. I just want to know what i should pack and prepare for on such an epic journey.I would like to take in more of the "back roads" as opposed to all highway.I am lookin for trip planning sites snd such.I will be getting a gps .What is a goo one for a motorcycle. I know i will need more than just my saddle bags. a trunk or some other luggage will be needed. I figure the trip will take 3 weeks plus. i think i can be ready in about 2 yrs as far as cash to do it. any help will be greatly appreciated. I want to do this before i retire. I am riding an 06 king pin with 8200 mi. Thanks agin.,
 

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Spank the best trips are the ones planned out and sounds like your starting off on the right foot. Succesful/Enjoyable IBA rides of 1000+ miles all start with logistics and planning the route for success. Working your self into the groove is going to be important. Have you made many 500 mile day trips? If not work your way into it 300-500 and you will start finding out first hand what works and what doesnt.

Here is a link to the IBA website of some tips to prep for long hauls.
http://www.ironbutt.com/tech/aow.cfm

I would use googlemaps to start your planning just for ease and sharing with others. Set waypoints to the areas you want to hit, drag your routes around and get a rough outline. Then start plotting milage. 200 miles on interstate can be around a 3hr avg and thats a decent time in the saddle. Gas stops take around 20 min or less if you gas-n-go, not hanging out. When on the road with at least 2 fuel stops I will buzz through the 1st and take a little time at the 2nd. So you can do your daily math there with straight interstate avg about 55-60mph actual and then backing off that for the countryside your driving in and how many pit stops your gonna make to figure out how much travel you will get a day. Best thing to do there is plan a trip on some twistys, see how you do on your style and mpg then map your fuel stops and over all daily stop off of that.

Packing light, med kit, tool kit, rain gear and having it in accesible locations will come as you make a few of those 300-500 mile trips on a saturday.
GPS - 1000 recommendations and thoughts, i would only say thing blue-tooth and a Sena for your helmet. Ear protection is important (use plugs) and having something other than the engine every once in a while is nice too. Power recharging for your phone on the bike a thought too.
06 KP going to need a couple oil changes while your out too. Dealership or roadside??
Last thing, weather throughout your route (temps) as well as where your going...

That should get you spinning in A direction, hopefully right.. hehehe Looking forward to seeing this plan out. Maybe start the trip planner from your regional forum. Plent of folks to help you out here.

Safe ridin,
Tim
 

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I have done many if these style trips, last month we did Atlanta to San Francisco via Grand Canyon, Hoover Dam, Vegas, Yosemite and Yellowstone and lots of cool points in between, we did 6k in 12 days, the trick to doing these things is planning, I've been getting with AAA to help plan my stops along the way, well worth the 50 or so a year I give em, GPS is a must, the Garmin Zumo 650 is pricey but worth it, gear I would recommend is a good pack able rain suit with boot covers, if you have riding partners I would also recommend a communication system, being able to chat makes the boring miles fly by


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Every clothing item should do double or triple duty. Don't pack heavy coats, plan on layering. Get yourself some underliners for hot weather and a couple pair of those $16 riding socks--they are wonderful. I like the Sockz brand. In addition to a GPS, carry paper maps. Join AAA for two reasons; roadside assistance and maps and tour guides. Are you going to tent camp or motel it, or both? When you answer that, I'll make additional suggestions.
A magnetic tankbag is a must for me. It displays my paper map and holds items I need at hand and contains my Platypus, the water bag that normally goes into one of those backpack hydrators. I fill it with ice, then add water, wrap it in a towel for insulation. I place it on top of everything in the tankbag with its hose end clipped where I can reach it. That allows me to hydrate on the go. A real lifesaver.
 

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How do I go about doing this? I have been riding for apprx 4 yrs to date.So i do not have any experience on this matter. I want to ride from RI to the Grand Canyon and tour a little more of our great country on the ride back. I just want to know what i should pack and prepare for on such an epic journey.I would like to take in more of the "back roads" as opposed to all highway.I am lookin for trip planning sites snd such.I will be getting a gps .What is a goo one for a motorcycle. I know i will need more than just my saddle bags. a trunk or some other luggage will be needed. I figure the trip will take 3 weeks plus. i think i can be ready in about 2 yrs as far as cash to do it. any help will be greatly appreciated. I want to do this before i retire. I am riding an 06 king pin with 8200 mi. Thanks agin.,

I guess that I am 180 degrees out from the norm... I go on at least one long trip a year and sometimes more than one. I rarely, if ever know more than what general direction I want to travel... I do carry a gps for emergency use, but find that stopping and talking to people along the way enhances the trip and I usually end up near where I am wanting to be. I never plan exactly how many miles I will travel in any given day... instead I ride as far or not as I feel like it. If there is a particular sight that I want to add to my witness list, I do make sure that I get there... but not always any particular day. Just ride... take a few side roads that look interesting and have fun. I remember one morning I took a side road that looked interesting and it was and I met the nicest people... the funny thing about it was that the road came out behind the motel that I had left about 3 hours earlier that morning, LOL
 

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I guess that I am 180 degrees out from the norm... I go on at least one long trip a year and sometimes more than one. I rarely, if ever know more than what general direction I want to travel...
Unless you're sleeping in a tent on the side of the road, that can be kinda dicey. A few years back another couple and us were just enjoying a ride thru Canada, NY, and Pa. It got dark and we decided we'd better find a motel. Problem was for many miles thereafter, they were all sold out for one event or another.

We were exhausted when we finally found a spot and overpaid, but at the point, money wasn't a consideration.
 

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How do I go about doing this? I have been riding for apprx 4 yrs to date.So i do not have any experience on this matter. I want to ride from RI to the Grand Canyon and tour a little more of our great country on the ride back. I just want to know what i should pack and prepare for on such an epic journey.I would like to take in more of the "back roads" as opposed to all highway.I am lookin for trip planning sites snd such.I will be getting a gps .What is a goo one for a motorcycle. I know i will need more than just my saddle bags. a trunk or some other luggage will be needed. I figure the trip will take 3 weeks plus. i think i can be ready in about 2 yrs as far as cash to do it. any help will be greatly appreciated. I want to do this before i retire. I am riding an 06 king pin with 8200 mi. Thanks agin.,
I have many miles in the long distance riding world, you are on the right track searching and planning the run.

Some things I have learned over the years:

Build in margin in your budgeting, if you average 50 mpg, plan on 40mpg... Fuel $$$ plan on 25% higher, meals can be cheap, one good meal perday, light lunch and good breakfast can be $50.00 per, budget a little more. lodging is typically anywhere from $100-$200.00 per night national average fro a good hotel. don't undersetimate a good nights sleep. If your camping, this is more stuff to carry.

Need Good rain gear, if you get wet and keep riding you will get cold to the point you can get in trouble.

Remember what your doing, riding, so pack riding gear and plan to do laundry every couple days. you don't need as much stuff as you think. Think about a jacket that is a three season type with removable liners.

Packing sounds stupid, but roll up your stuff, 1, it takes up less room, and 2. it will be less wrinkled.

Luggage, if you are going solo there are a bunch of option that fit in your back seat and can be used as a back rest. you do not need as much as you think you do. and if you do need something there are stores along the way. Suggest you pack for 6 days and plan to do wash every 4-5.


Dehydration on a long ride is not a good thing, a cup holder with an insoulated cup to drink from help ward that off. Hot days and hot sun will drain you quickly.

Simple tools to make emergancy repairs to include tire repair and a way to reinflate.

Lodging, depending on the time of year and the area this can be a challenge. two schools of thought here, plan you trip so that you have a lodging destination each night and make reservation months in advance. This will most time get you a cheaper rate. Join the rewards progam for a hotel chain, out west it is Best Western good places to stay and priced fair.

Or take an adhoc approach stop when you are tired and find a place.availbility might be an issue.

Route planning, First day can be a long day limit your long days to 400-500 miles, next day make the ride shorter, give yourself time to recoup, if Day one was 500 miles day two should be 300 miles. and alternate long and short to keep your engery level and interest up. There is nothing more draining than running long days and getting there worn out. It is about the journey the destination just sets the direction.

Fuel stops if you can go 200 miles to a tank plan on stopping at 150 this way you have plenty of reserve if the station is closed or no longer in business. Do not depend on the GPS to locate a an open fuel station. Got caught out in Montana one year having to wait to the next day for the station to open to fuel because I ran to close to empty.

No new or repairs 30 days before setting out. 90% if your problems will come from recent repairs.

Look over the bike, guide I use is if it is 50% or worse replace it before the ride, this includes tires brakes, filters etc.

Keep in your back pocket the locations of Victory dealerships along your route, if you have a problem that you can't fix onthe roadside at least you have a repair/parts choice.

GPS, my choice is the Zumo 665, get the weather subscription as it will show you NEXRAD information on weather in your area as well as direction of travel of weather. Could be a life saver in Tornado country.

Music or a lovely passenger to talk with, it helps on the long days of long flat roads in the west.



Last thought,
Ride smart, don't be in a hurry to get to the next stop. Weather will be an issue at times if it is bad or you can see it coming don't be afriad to detour around it or stop short and find a place to stay until it blows thru. Summer heat in the west creates some kick A$$ T storms that deliver hail, high winds and heavy rain.

Suncreen is your friend.
 

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I go along with HandyHoward's school of thought about travel; aim the front wheel in the general direction you're going and be curious. Charles Kurault is my mentor. If you are too young to know who he is, Google his book,Charles Kurault's America. My brother would plan way in advance, per Squatch's recommendation and that has two downsides: every day was goal oriented with no leeway for checking out that neat attraction or visiting with locals and if you have a breakdown (as happened to my brother) all that planning and reserving goes down the toilet along with deposits, if any.
I prefer to motel it, less to pack, a private bathroom at my disposal, all the motel amenities (+ a pool) and a breakfast. I don't know where Squatch lies his head, but I have never paid over $90+ tax for a nice room anywhere away from big cities. There are many ways to discount from rack rates and here are a few....
* Best Western Ride Rewards: bwrider.com Phone 888 BW2BIKE
* We like the CHOICE hotel chain cuz they are everywhere, have a wide range of price categories and we rack up free stay points fast. choiceprivileges.com Phone 888 228-2000 or 888 499-4888. I also have an AMA discount number I give them, sign up
for that.
* Sign up for Wyndham Rewards. That's Days Inn, Super 8, Knights Inn, HoJo and six more. Hell, sign up for any and all rewards programs.
* Pick up those motel discount coupon books found at rest stops, truck stops, fast food joints near Interstates and Denny's. Most times, that's your best buy. Many times, I was checking in at a coupon price of $40 to $49 and the schmuck down the counter was paying in the $80s for the same type of room. The proviso using the coupon is its usually on a walk-in basis only, but I have called at times and had a room held for me at the coupon rate.
Traveling as Handy and I do, I call the CRS (central reservation service) phone number around 3:00pm to make a reservation, as I pretty well know where I'm going to want to
stop by then. I usually put the sidestand down around 5:00 unless its stinking hot, then its earlier.
Avoid the area anywhere near the oil fields in the Midwest, all the motels are occupied by the workers. Found that out the hard way.
When making reservations, state ALL your discounts at the beginning of the call.
Have 2 credit cards, in case there's a problem with one and an ATM card for getting cash along the way.
I like motels with outside doors and get a ground floor room, so my bike is just a few steps away. I'll ask the desk for rags, fill a wastebasket with water and wipe down the bike. Never, never use the room towels for that, please. I might be the next rider to want a room and they'll tell me to go elsewhere cuz of that. It happened.
 

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I have one long roadtrip and one short road trip under my belt and I am two days away from leaving on a Lake Superior Circle Tour. I ride two up and camp, leaving sparse room for packing on a Kingpin Tour. I use Google Maps to view an approximate route and research points of interest in the towns along the way. For my upcoming ride, I was connected to www.ridelakesuperior.com. I quizzed my local Victory riding group and was given a reference to an Adventure Rider post that had great details and photos. My longest one day ride ever was 400+. So, on my trips, I do maybe 150 - 250. I am not inclined to do a SaddleSore 1000 anytime soon. Pick the non-interstate routes. Stop in the small towns. On my first trip, a light rain turned into a drenching storm. Stop under a canopy and wait it out and put rain gear on before getting wet. A check engine light came on then disappeared. Don't ignore check engine lights. Find a shop and get the code read. The 18V output of my voltage regulator blew out my low beam and could have caused more damage to electronics. Bring a spare pair of gloves. Riding in wet one's sucks. Have fun and smile when the road sign has the curves ahead indicator and says next 6 miles!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks guys for all the info. I will eagerly be researching this. It has allways been something i have wanted to do.I know i still have a good amount of stuff to buy to boot but 1 thing at a time. I have done a few New Hampshire runs same day. close to 400 mi runs so i am"in training" so to speak. I really cant wait to do this.
 

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All good info... something i thought of... call you credit card companies and let them know you are on a road trip... i have two protection programs on mine...they detect unusual patterns and will put a hold on the card....
 

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You mean like this?




Great thread- Planning a trip myself shortly.

m
There's one of those signs in the mountains around the Napa Valley that states 28 miles!
KingpinRider, et al....keep some latex food handler gloves on board, they take up no room at all and are great rain riding, tire changing, rectal exams, etc. If its cold, wear riding gloves over 'em.
That was a great idea to tell your credit card provider you are taking your cards for a ride. Otherwise, you can have trouble getting charges validated as that's a red flag to the fraud division that a card has been stolen.
 

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Some good tips so far. I've done it both ways and always seem to have better memories of the times that were less planned. The clothing suggestions, packing suggestions and credit card suggestions, along with hydration and never underestimating your fuel status are all important though.

I'd also go to a local book store and find one of the dozens of books available that point out odd things to see in the United States, like the world's biggest rocking chair or something goofy like that. Most of that stuff is located in areas where the local charm and people make for some interesting memories.
 

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Don't forget to pack a roll of TP. I keep one in a zip lock bag. You never know when you'll need to head for the woods.
 
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