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Discussion Starter #1
I just changed my clutch and it works much better than before. However, when reinstalling the clutch pinion shaft and clutch arm, I was no able to follow the instructions in the service manual. The manual says to install the pinion shaft with the clutch arm 15 +/- 5 degrees left of the primary cover parting line. If it is more, then you are supposed to pull pinion shaft out slightly to disengage teeth, rotate slightly inboard, and push back into place nesting the teeth in the next available "slot".

I don't know why but when I install my pinion shaft, the clutch arm is more than 15 degrees and if I try to index it one notch inboard, it is less than 15 degrees. Below is a picture of the clutch arm in the greater than 15 degrees position. It has a clutch pull relief device on it but this does not change the overall angle.

I have adjusted the bracket holding the metal tube out of which the clutch cable protrudes so that the tube and cable are concentric. This should minimize side wear on the cable from rubbing on the lip of the metal tube. I have test ridden the bike and the clutch appears to operate correctly. Changing the clutch plates/steels has solved my problem of slipping.

My question is: Will having the clutch arm well outside of the specified 15 +/- 5 degrees position cause any problems?

Thanks for any help you can offer.
 

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I'd say no; you don't need to worry about this. If it's adjusted right with no binding anywhere with both ends well greased and moving freely and you don't have any issue shifting then you should be good to go.

Of course; keep an eye on it for a while just to make sure.
 

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Which clutch plates did you install? I installed the Alto Red Eagle plates and my clutch lever is much closer to vertical than OEM was. It might be a difference in plate thickness if you didn't get OEM.
 

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I guess I'm confused. If the clutch grabs and releases properly, why does it matter how the arm looks?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes, it was Alto brand bought off of Ebay. They pack of 9 steels and 8 friction plates was slightly thicker than the pack of OEM plates/steels. IndyVictory, your confusion mirrors mine. The clutch releases and grabs great. While using a clutch pull relief device, I can now adjust the clutch lever so that I get no slipping under hard acceleration and no gear chatter when the clutch lever is fully pulled in and I am down shifting into 2nd or 1st. I love the new clutch. However, the service manual is specific and says the clutch arm must be 15 +/- 5 degrees outboard of the primary parting line. This is the source of my confusion and why I asked the question.
 

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I agree with Bbob on this, if it works it works ...

Andre using TaPaTaLk
 

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Hmmmm

When I had mine out while working on the starter sprag (probably didn't need to but)...and reinstalled it it is "out to far". It works fine so until I get a problem not gonna worry it and don't believe you should either. LMYR
 

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What this adjustment tries to accomplish is roughly equal over center travel. This will give you the most motion available at the clutch lever. Easier on your hand, easier to adjust the cable.
 

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Yes, it was Alto brand bought off of Ebay. They pack of 9 steels and 8 friction plates was slightly thicker than the pack of OEM plates/steels.

My Alto set was 9 frictions and 9 steels. Maybe you're missing a plate?

Here's the info from my purchase:

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Alto Red Eagle Clutch Kit for 2001-2013 Victory Motorcycles - Alto EC095751

This Kit contains the following:
(9) Friction Plates, .087" Thickness
(9) Steel Plates, .063" Thickness

--------------------------------------------

If your stack was slightly thicker, that would cause your lever to be out more then normal. I didn't compare mine.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The Victory XCT clutch pack has a special plate with wider friction pads on the outermost side (up against the pressure plate) and another special friction plate on the innermost side that fits around the two judder spring components. These two special friction plates were not replaced. With a friction plate on either end already present, you have to use one more steel than you use friction plates. Hence, the 9/8 steel/plate. I ended up with one friction plate unused. Did I install it wrong?
 

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The Victory XCT clutch pack has a special plate with wider friction pads on the outermost side (up against the pressure plate) and another special friction plate on the innermost side that fits around the two judder spring components. These two special friction plates were not replaced. With a friction plate on either end already present, you have to use one more steel than you use friction plates. Hence, the 9/8 steel/plate. I ended up with one friction plate unused. Did I install it wrong?
Possibly. I re-used the Victory innermost friction plate (with the larger inner diameter) along with the judder spring and spacer. Then I used all 9 frictions and steels. I didn't have any leftover pieces...
 

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It is so easy to index the clutch arm anywhere you want it to be. Don't like where it is, move it over a tooth. Only takes a minute.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It is so easy to index the clutch arm anywhere you want it to be. Don't like where it is, move it over a tooth. Only takes a minute.
My apology. I must not have explained my situation adequately. It is trivially easy for me to index the clutch arm. The problem is that one position is ~40 degrees outboard of the primary parting line and the next position has the clutch arm at about 0 degrees (i.e. parallel to the primary parting line. That would make sense if there are 9 grooves in the spline on the end of the clutch pinion arm (360/9 = 40 degrees). Given my two choices (40 degrees outboard or 0 degrees outboard), my question was which is the better option. Neither will match the service manual spec of 15 +/- 5 degrees outboard.
If I choose the 40 degrees outboard, are there any negative consequences?
 

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My apology. I must not have explained my situation adequately. It is trivially easy for me to index the clutch arm. The problem is that one position is ~40 degrees outboard of the primary parting line and the next position has the clutch arm at about 0 degrees (i.e. parallel to the primary parting line. That would make sense if there are 9 grooves in the spline on the end of the clutch pinion arm (360/9 = 40 degrees). Given my two choices (40 degrees outboard or 0 degrees outboard), my question was which is the better option. Neither will match the service manual spec of 15 +/- 5 degrees outboard.
If I choose the 40 degrees outboard, are there any negative consequences?
I didn't explain adequately either. It would be easy to TRY IT both ways and see. You can compare force needed to pull the lever in and holding force required to hold the lever in. Whatever you prefer as long as you're not side-loading the cable or out of adjustment distance.
 

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Personally as long as you have proper engagement/ dis-engagement of the clutch I'd say you're fine. The only other issue that might occur is that the arm is 'sticking out' more from the side of the bike. As long as that doesn't interfere go for it.
 
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