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I'm a new rider (although I rode dirt bikes much of my childhood) and I thought this would be a good forum to get tips and discuss safety. Who better to ask then the veterans? thumb up What is the best advice you have for staying safe on a bike? What has your experience taught you?
 

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Get this book and read it twice: [ame]http://www.amazon.com/Proficient-Motorcycling-Ultimate-Guide-Riding/dp/1889540536/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1377839365&sr=8-1&keywords=Proficient+riding[/ame]

In case my link doesn't work, the title is "Proficient Motorcycling". Also, practice in parking lots enough to make starting, stopping, swerving and emergency braking second nature to you.

Other than that, buy a bike with abs brakes if you can. And enjoy!!!!


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Always ride within your skill level. Ride often and know you weakness and constantly work on improving it. Always expect that car to come over in your lane. Ride with a contingency plan and have an escape route. Just a few things I have learned in the last 20 yrs of riding.
 

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EJ8 Welcome back to riding. I also returned to riding a few years back. Had ridden dirt bikes as a kid and had not ridden in 30 years. My friends told me to be very cautious at intersections as cars tend to pull out in front of bikes and they do. Get comfortable on your bike and that comes from practice. I bought the video Ride Like A Pro. There is a new one out. You can watch some of it on You Tube and order it on Amazon $30.00 if you like it. Remember where your head and eyes go your bike will go. IMHO a lot of good info and exercises in the videos. I also ordered New HID lights HI and LO from Victory HID.com a member on this forum. Great product, price, and service. Makes the bike much more visible to drivers and great for night riding as it lights up the roads. Hope some of this helps. Enjoy your bike and Ride Safe.
 

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Ride like every car is going to pull out in front of you. This has helped me and saved my life over the 20 years I have been riding.


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Don't leave the garage.
 

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Heres what I told my daughters boyfriend thats getting his motorcycle licenes. He ask to go for a ride with me on mine. (him in the back of course), and give him tips.

This is what I told him while riding, (We were in the city)

Me- "You see that car?
Him- "yes".
ME - you see that other car?
Him, "yes"
Me - "And that other car up ahead"
Him yet again "YES"
Me- "then I said they all want to kill you!"
Me- "They dont see you!"
Me- "They dont here you!"
Me- "They want to kill you again"
Him- "Ummm ok wow."

As you can expect after that I gave him pointers on turning, braking, and othere stuff. When stopped I explained more on the cars, trucks, vans, and everything else thats out to get us everytime we mount up. Told him about not only looking at the cars around you but the one in frount of them that can cause them to do something and get you.

Needless to say he thanked me and said he had alot of stuff to think about when he rides. I said yep, all this helps you to stay up, and the rubber down.

You down and the rubber up aint cool. cheers

This is just some stuff I told him, maybe you can use it, maybe you already know it. Just keep it right side up. :)
 

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Constantly evaluate your position in traffic to makes sure drivers have the best opportunity to see you. Get the Ride Like A Pro DVD and practice it too.
 

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Always ride within your skill level. Ride often and know you weakness and constantly work on improving it. Always expect that car to come over in your lane. Ride with a contingency plan and have an escape route. Just a few things I have learned in the last 20 yrs of riding.
Very, very good advice! Know your skill level. Put your first thousand miles on the bike on country roads and empty parking lots!
Know this, if an oncoming car is preparing to turn left across your path HE DOES NOT SEE YOU, even if you think you made eye contact!!! Know that in your heart. Lefty turners kill more bikers than anyone.

My experience has taught me that there are only 2 choices in a bad situation, lay it down or ride it out. Have a good idea which works for you beforehand, hesitation will kill you. I have found that my throttle has saved me much more often than my brakes so I ride perhaps a gear lower than most, I keep the bike in the powerband and when I feel trouble coming I'm gone in a flash.

DON"T ride in a pack until your skill improves, and even then get some do's and don'ts from the people you will ride with.

Some other simple observations over the years:

Potholes hide in the shadows.

Wet paint, pavers and the oil in the middle of the lane will dump you.

Beware black ice in the winter, it hides on bridges and in the shadows.

You will NEVER be able to predict an animal's next move. NEVER

If you ride with someone else and are new, assume the appropriate position, behind and to the right.

I hope at least part of this gets through. The fact that you were humble enough to ask this question speaks volumes. Lastly, don't forget to enjoy yourself and welcome aboard.

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Take an MSF approved motorcycle safety class. While there is a TON on advice from our members, MSF put 30+ years of research into how to present you information to keep you safe AND for you to remember it.

I, too, started in the dirt. When I moved to the road I was given a RUDE awakening of how not all my skills translated and how to correct it. I learned so much, I decided to teach to help other riders. Seek and take a course. Take the basic and the the advanced.

www.msf-USA.org

Ride safe.


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Don't leave the garage.
Yep.
You own a heavyweight cruiser and post 3 is looking for safety tips?

Assess well what you have gotten yourself into. No amount of foresight, education, training, or gear will save you from a Buick. Period. You can shave the odds, but it's like blackjack. At best you can tip the scales to just lean toward 50/50 in your favor. That means the house has a 50/50 chance of butchering you.

Right now some sweet young thing with a Pepsodent smile is going to the mall in her Solaris. She is about to disembowel a fifty year old father of 4 on his bike because her mascara is smudging when she blinks. He has ridden for thirty odd years and is a safety instructor who has a closet full of gear and tickets in his top drawer to fly to DC to present a safe riding seminar at a national safety conference. Nope. Dead.

This ain't calligraphy or numismatism. If it's about looking hot there's Arthur Murray.

I can't get enough of bikes. I am lucky to say that I have only been in intensive care for 29 days of the thousands of days I have been riding motorcycles. Hopefully you will get to say something like that. Hopefully you will be left in a condition where you can say anything at all.

If any of that gives you pause to think about what you are doing, well maybe you will be LUCKY enough to strike a bargain with fate.

Good luck.
 

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I'm a new rider (although I rode dirt bikes much of my childhood) and I thought this would be a good forum to get tips and discuss safety. Who better to ask then the veterans? thumb up What is the best advice you have for staying safe on a bike? What has your experience taught you?
Safe riding tips... take a couple of courses to develop/improve your skills, just because some of us have ridden for a life time or two doesn't mean we are safe of have safe practices.

Depending on where you ride, the traffic can be very unkind to you. as HC stated plan ahead, and keep planning ahead. Play the what if game, what will I do if... the car pulls out in front of me... the truck back up.... the oncoming car decides to pass...

Be comfortable on your bike. if you are comfortable you will likely be able to apply actions without causing you more trouble.

Know your limitations ( bike and you)

Ge tin the habit of looking in cars ahead of you and seein gwhat the driver is or is not doing and adjust. Most of the time around here they don't see you because they are not looking.

Loud pipes do not save lives! Developing safe practices and skill set does. (Round here they ignor the fire truck at 80,000+# looking like the 4th of July and sounding like a bad rock band)

Be respectful and do not let anger dictate your actions...

Ride to be seen, position your bike to use the most space in your lane stay out of center lane zones traffic comes from both sides.

Dress for the slide not the ride.... if is cool to ride in a tee shirt un til you go down... safety gear will take much more abuse than you skin....

Want to go fast... go to the track...

And remember it is not if you will go down or be invloved in an accident.... it is when....

Personal nit pick, if you have the right of way continue until it is unsafe to do so. The folks that jam up traffic to let someone merge drive me nuts and cause accidents. if you slow to be nice, you might just end up on the recieving end of a front bumper who is in a hurry to go nowhere...

My scan involves:
- looking at things that are moving, they will hurt me
- looking at things that can move, they can hurt me
- I look behind as much as I look forward as I have first hand witnessed a cage kill a rider at a red light because they did not stop... and the rider did not see him coming and was hit from behind he was in the lane next to me.
- look as far ahed of you as you can, do not watch the car ahead of you look as far ahead as you can you will see more.

and Brakes are not always the answer...

the answer is not always do.... it is a dynamic environment.
 

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One more thing,
Don't give up, I have witnessed many who gave up on dealing with the event that could have handled it but they gave up and crashed.

Bad:
Case I am thinking of is a new rider hard corner, foot peg hits the ground, immediatly stand the bike up and hits the brakes... end result dumped it into a guard rail. Gave up

Good:
Different rider, foolboard drags, straightens up but is headed to a rock wall, continues to ride thru the corner keep riding thru the corner soils his pants but misses the rock face and he and the bike live to ride another day. Didn't give up Bravo.

Rider got tapped by a merging car, rear of the bike slides rider controls the slide and rides it out to regain control and stop. 2002 Gold Wing, missing the right side bag, SUV scratch on the bumper both alive.

Don't give up on the situation
 

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All the suggestions are great but here is one that is often not thought of because it is so apparent. When coming to a stop look where both feet are going to be placed on the ground. When I started riding again I stop a light and the pavement on the left side was right there HOWEVER on the right side was drain slope so steep had I not checked I would have fallen over and been trapped under the bike in the drain most likely with a broken leg or ankle.
 

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I'm a new rider (although I rode dirt bikes much of my childhood) and I thought this would be a good forum to get tips and discuss safety. Who better to ask then the veterans? thumb up What is the best advice you have for staying safe on a bike? What has your experience taught you?
I didn't read the others posts, so if this is repeated, well I guess it needed to be, LOL

Dirt rider. Good you know how to operate the controls, that is about all you learned that is very helpful on a street ride. Others may disagree but too many things you should do or can get away with will get you hurt on the paved roads, it will come in handy if you dual sport though.

Take a BRC, (Basic Riders Course), some places require them, but worth the time no matter how long you have ridden. Take a ARC as soon as you can.

Watch car wheels, not the actual car, ride in the correct lane position, never assume you have been seen, stay out of blind spots, don't tailgate, own your lane, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,it goes on.

Main thing is use the equipment between your ears! Never let it go dim, and leave the tough guy attitude at home, it isn't that helpful on the road.

Cheers
 

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EJ8, I have read all the posts and tips and all of them are very good advice that you should heed. There is very little I can add, but over 60 years of riding has taught me these...
+ Look where you want to go, not where you're going.
+ Dress for the crash, not for the weather. Sweat rinses off, road rash doesn't.
+ Trust your tires...you'll give up before they will.
+ Take that rider course...what's your life worth.
+ Don't ride in the middle of the lane, that's where the screws and nails are.
+ Have more than the minimum required liability insurance and have comp coverage.
+ Check out Capt. Crash Videos on line...great one to three minute riding tips.
+ And lastly (this'll piss a lot of guys here) if you have half a head, wear half a helmet. Dig?
Now go ride, pay attention, practice, be aware of your surroundings and oh, have fun.
 
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