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What Jim G bought after all was said and done . . .

Many of you know that I recently sold my highly customized VTX 1800 Retro because I was ready for a new project.

I was thinking I’d get a Victory, because I have never owned one and am intrigued by both The Vegas 8 Ball (very simple black bike with greta lines), and the 2007 Vegas Jackpot and Jackpot Arlen Ness versions. I cam very, very close to buying a 2007 Jackpot in the fabulous yellow /purple / etc paint scheme – a really nice bike, and only 5900 miles on it.

I had some reservations, related to the local dealership, not the bike. I was getting pretty consistent feedback from multiple sources about the local Victory dealership not stocking commonly needed parts and accessories, and while my personal experience with the dealer's service department had been fine (I bought tires and a few small repairs there for my Honda VTX 1800R), I really did not like the sales department.

Then my wife intervened.

She pointed out that when I visited a motorcycle shop, it was usually a Harley shop, and that I always had a great time everytime I visited Cowboy Harley-Davidson, our nearest local HD dealership in Austin. She pointed out that while the cost of entry to a Harley is a bit high, the ongoing costs are pretty reasonable, and the quality of parts, motorclothes, and services is consistently great, and she is correct. She said I was ultimately going to end up there again (I had owned a 1200 Sportster about 3 to 4 years ago), so I may as well skip the stops along the way and just do it!

I pointed out that while I could buy the Victory for cash, and it was in excellent shape, used Harleys hold their value well enough that I’d need to finance a portion of the cost, and frankly if I were to do that, I’d rather buy a new one and start with zero miles, a full 2 year warranty, and know the bike has never been abused or neglected. To my surprise, she not only agreed, but INSISTED that I buy a new Harley! (Yes, I am blessed with the World’s greatest wife).

Then, she insisted we visit Cowboy Harley on Saturday, which we did, and our salesman there showed us a 2014 HD “Breakout”, which the shop had already, on spec, started to customize a bit. He walked us into the shop, where “Brian”, the best tech in the shop, was in the process of changing over from the stock wheels to the outrageous HD chrome “Turbine” wheels. Both my wife and I fell immediately for the wheels, and also for the paint on this particular bike. It is Harley’s new “Hard Candy Chrome Flake” and it is simply fabulous (photos don’t do it justice).

We thought about it over the weekend, and on Monday, we returned to the dealership and bought and bought and rode home that Breakout with the Turbine wheels, and included in the deal the later installation of an adjustable lowering kit for the rear, a D&D 2 into 1 exhaust, HD performance intake, HD Super Tuner, and a detailed dyno tune. According to D&D’s published dyno chart, the above combination will increase the power of the 103 engine by a little over 20%.

For those not familiar with new Harleys, they are so “choked” by the factory on both intake and exhaust to achieve the noise emissions levels that experienced HD buyers do at least the basics of freeing up both the exhaust and intake. When I did this on my Sporster 1200, I got an immediate 18% gain at the rear wheels on the dyno, and it looks like on the Breakout the gain will be a bit over 20%, with the torque gains being very fat along along the rpm curve, not concentrated at the top.

On Thursday, the last of the required accessory add-on arrived, and I dropped the bike off at Cowboy last evening. It will be ready probably Monday! The service manager promised me it will be “transformed” by the power mods!

Here are some photos:


















In addition to the bike itself, the nicest part is that my wife, who has not usually wanted to come long on rides, is really looking forward to being a passenger on the Breakout, and bought herself a nice new leather jacket!

I think this is going to be a great experience . . .

Jim G
 

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Nice bike. Enjoy the ride.
 

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VERY nice looking ride:D. But I got $10 bucks that say you ain't riding it far with those bars and Momma ain't gonna like that passenger seat, at all, after about 10 miles:mad:. But both of those are comfort items and easily changedthumb up
 

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Congrats on the Breakout. They're a stunning bike. The Turbine wheels are gorgeous. Enjoy!
 

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I'm not knocking your bike. It is a gorgeous piece of equipment. But I've seen LOTS of great looking bikes that I would never ride or own.

I prefer a little balance (function vs form=looks vs practicality). Both figuratively and literally. :)

Still...a nice looking bike though.

Wally
 

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Nice bike, congrats!

Now Jim G will join a HD forum and hopefully not join in the Victory slander conversations...
 

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Jim congrats on your purchase. Nice looking ride! There are many things that we need to consider when purchasing a bike. It sounds like you factored in many things that will make you happy with your purchase moving forward.

Congrats again and ride safe.
 

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Nice looking bike. Have fun!

But as for the world's nicest wife; when my KLR blew up (battery issue fried the electrical small fire 6 inches away from my twig and berries but nothing unfixable) the first words out of her mouth were "looks like we should go buy you a new bike", thats how I got my Judge. Looks like we have some competition for the worlds greatest wife! cheers

Too bad you're not joining the fam. But you'll have fun. Keep the rubber side down man!

Cheers
 

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Nice bike. But your wife is gonna loath that seat !
 

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You've got the best Garage Queen. Now the wife can say her husband has a Hard-Lee. cheers As far as her being on it... well, let us know how many miles she's able to endure. Probably one ride around the block, once and never again.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Yes, I've warned my wife about the seat, but she wants to "give it a chance" since it makes the bike look sleek. Generous of her, but not well advised - i plan to get a different seat that I can swap in or out depending on whether or not she is riding on a given trip. It's one bolt on a Harley, and even that one bolt can be replaced by a knurled knob available at any Harley dealership.

But the bars, I LOVE! They are similar to the Baron Xtreme drag bars I had on my VTX, but with a lower riser, which works great because the seta is less than 25" above the ground with the rider aboard!! Perfect for me. I've done only 68 miles so far, but it felt great.

But then, my history includes bikes like the early Honda Interceptors, the CBR900RR, the Hayabusa, and a Ducati 996, so these bars are WAY more comfortable than any of those bikes!! The Ducati was the most extreme - you "crouched and folded" similar to the stance on a racing bicycle, except with the legs scrunched as well. Even that bike was surprisingly comfortable once you settled into it (just like bicyclists - including me - swear by the folded up position they ride in).

No one commented on the mirror stem length - maybe because it is not apparent in the photos. The stems on the Breakout are VERY short, as part of the "drag bike" silhouette, and I sometimes brush the right hand mirror as a result when reaching for the brake. I need to picot that mirror just a bit forward to eliminate that.

By the way, the bike is insanely nimble despite its 700 lb wet weight. After the VTX, and even compared to the Victory Jackpot, it feels "like a 250" in comparison. No kidding. Way lighter feeling and nimbler than the Harley 1200 Sportser I used to have, despite its actual weight being about 100 pounds more than that Sportster. I think it's because all the major chunks of weight in the bike are very low to the ground, and Lord knows there's not much fender metal in THOSE fenders! The front fender is actually the smallest it can legally be in some states where fenders are required and minimum size is specified.

Jim G
 

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In the end the only opinion that matters is yours and your wife's. Ride what you want no matter what anyone else says. I could care less if you ride a Victory, Harley, Honda, or even a Ural :eek:

The ONLY thing that important is that you ride thumb up
 

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Yes, I've warned my wife about the seat, but she wants to "give it a chance" since it makes the bike look sleek. Generous of her, but not well advised - i plan to get a different seat that I can swap in or out depending on whether or not she is riding on a given trip. It's one bolt on a Harley, and even that one bolt can be replaced by a knurled knob available at any Harley dealership.

But the bars, I LOVE! They are similar to the Baron Xtreme drag bars I had on my VTX, but with a lower riser, which works great because the seta is less than 25" above the ground with the rider aboard!! Perfect for me. I've done only 68 miles so far, but it felt great.

But then, my history includes bikes like the early Honda Interceptors, the CBR900RR, the Hayabusa, and a Ducati 996, so these bars are WAY more comfortable than any of those bikes!!
Yes, they probably are...and I've seen people endure far worse.

But it does kinda surprise me that a guy with your level of experience with bikes is going to lower a bike with next to no suspension travel as it is. IIRC, the bike's only got like 24° of lean angle stock. Lower it and you'll be dragging hard parts by just thinking of changing directions. Lower it and put a passenger on the back and you'll be lucky if the rear fender doesn't become an additional brake pad acting on your tire.

Tis a purdy thing, but I'm thinking that long, two up rides are not its strong suit.
 

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What Jim G bought after all was said and done . . .

Many of you know that I recently sold my highly customized VTX 1800 Retro because I was ready for a new project.

I was thinking I’d get a Victory, because I have never owned one and am intrigued by both The Vegas 8 Ball (very simple black bike with greta lines), and the 2007 Vegas Jackpot and Jackpot Arlen Ness versions. I cam very, very close to buying a 2007 Jackpot in the fabulous yellow /purple / etc paint scheme – a really nice bike, and only 5900 miles on it.

I had some reservations, related to the local dealership, not the bike. I was getting pretty consistent feedback from multiple sources about the local Victory dealership not stocking commonly needed parts and accessories, and while my personal experience with the dealer's service department had been fine (I bought tires and a few small repairs there for my Honda VTX 1800R), I really did not like the sales department.

Then my wife intervened.

She pointed out that when I visited a motorcycle shop, it was usually a Harley shop, and that I always had a great time everytime I visited Cowboy Harley-Davidson, our nearest local HD dealership in Austin. She pointed out that while the cost of entry to a Harley is a bit high, the ongoing costs are pretty reasonable, and the quality of parts, motorclothes, and services is consistently great, and she is correct. She said I was ultimately going to end up there again (I had owned a 1200 Sportster about 3 to 4 years ago), so I may as well skip the stops along the way and just do it!

I pointed out that while I could buy the Victory for cash, and it was in excellent shape, used Harleys hold their value well enough that I’d need to finance a portion of the cost, and frankly if I were to do that, I’d rather buy a new one and start with zero miles, a full 2 year warranty, and know the bike has never been abused or neglected. To my surprise, she not only agreed, but INSISTED that I buy a new Harley! (Yes, I am blessed with the World’s greatest wife).

Then, she insisted we visit Cowboy Harley on Saturday, which we did, and our salesman there showed us a 2014 HD “Breakout”, which the shop had already, on spec, started to customize a bit. He walked us into the shop, where “Brian”, the best tech in the shop, was in the process of changing over from the stock wheels to the outrageous HD chrome “Turbine” wheels. Both my wife and I fell immediately for the wheels, and also for the paint on this particular bike. It is Harley’s new “Hard Candy Chrome Flake” and it is simply fabulous (photos don’t do it justice).

We thought about it over the weekend, and on Monday, we returned to the dealership and bought and bought and rode home that Breakout with the Turbine wheels, and included in the deal the later installation of an adjustable lowering kit for the rear, a D&D 2 into 1 exhaust, HD performance intake, HD Super Tuner, and a detailed dyno tune. According to D&D’s published dyno chart, the above combination will increase the power of the 103 engine by a little over 20%.

For those not familiar with new Harleys, they are so “choked” by the factory on both intake and exhaust to achieve the noise emissions levels that experienced HD buyers do at least the basics of freeing up both the exhaust and intake. When I did this on my Sporster 1200, I got an immediate 18% gain at the rear wheels on the dyno, and it looks like on the Breakout the gain will be a bit over 20%, with the torque gains being very fat along along the rpm curve, not concentrated at the top.

On Thursday, the last of the required accessory add-on arrived, and I dropped the bike off at Cowboy last evening. It will be ready probably Monday! The service manager promised me it will be “transformed” by the power mods!

Here are some photos:


















In addition to the bike itself, the nicest part is that my wife, who has not usually wanted to come long on rides, is really looking forward to being a passenger on the Breakout, and bought herself a nice new leather jacket!

I think this is going to be a great experience . . .

Jim G
Nice bike, reminds me of my first Harley (with the seat) way too many after market seats out there for Harley to leave the stocker on there for long. Notice the seat on mine, to me they look identical, and my OL was not a happy camper.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Yes, they probably are...and I've seen people endure far worse.

But it does kinda surprise me that a guy with your level of experience with bikes is going to lower a bike with next to no suspension travel as it is. IIRC, the bike's only got like 24° of lean angle stock. Lower it and you'll be dragging hard parts by just thinking of changing directions. Lower it and put a passenger on the back and you'll be lucky if the rear fender doesn't become an additional brake pad acting on your tire.

Tis a purdy thing, but I'm thinking that long, two up rides are not its strong suit.
The CVO version of the Breakout actually comes from the factory 1 inch lower.

The 24 degree angle is a very conservative measure that measures from the tips of the "consumable feelers" that are attached to the ends of the FOLDING pegs! The actual usable lean angle is better than that. Those feelers are about 1.5" long as I recall!

I like my bikes to be low, because I have a short inseam, and also a gravel driveway that is also a 7 percent grade. :) And, I cruise, I don't carve corners (used to carve corners years ago, but like to now savor the scenery instead).

As for comfort, don't underestimate what an enthused couple can do. In 1981, my wife and I went all around the United States, Minneapolis > Seattle > San Francisco > Grand Canyon > New Orleans > New York City > Boston > back to Minneapolis, all this:

- on a 1981 Suzuki 1100 "Superbike" (quickest bike on the road that year) with loud aftermarket exhaust & ridiculous seat quality

- No windshield

- 15 pounds of luggage total, on a small luggage rack (no saddle bags)

- Camera bag over my wife's shoulder

- in 3 1/2 weeks

- 9300 miles

and LOVED the trip. Took hundreds of slide photos. Carved curves on the Pacific Coast Highway with a Cycle magazine test group for about 20 miles (Wife shrieking the whole time though on THAT segment), crossed the desert from San Francisco to Needles in daylight at 110 degrees, and crossed the Macinack Bridge in Northern Michigan on the bike.

Yep. She is as nuts as I am.

Jim G
 

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Nice paint. The MoCo sure can do pretty right out of the box.

Mans got to have what his heart and wallet can agree on. Congrats on the new ride and having the ability to make the call.

As far as the long distance characteristics Jim, in 1981 I was doing a whole bunch of things comfortably and regularly that would kill me now. Some of them were motorcycles. I still have a hard tail shovel in the shed that, if I was inclined to, would carry my fat ass cross country but because it can is in no way motivation to try.

As you know these things are purpose built or at least the best of breed are. The Breakout certainly satisfies a variety of purposes. Long haul is not it's strong suit though.
 

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Nice, I like the retro metal flake paint jobs. One thing for sure if you can't find the things you want to change in the HD accessory catalog or the aftermarket it just doesn't exist. I still love my Wide Glide but at my age with all my aches and pains a smoother running smoother riding bike is more enjoyable for me.

Enjoy the new ride.

Tech23
 

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