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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm planning my first multi-day ride, around lake superior, for this summer and I am wondering what you would bring along as far as bike supplies/tools go?

I have the following so far in my leftside saddlebag:
Micro air compressor
Flat repair kit
Set of micro and standard fuses
Set of Allen T-handle wrenches (these are thin and lay flat)
Emergency clutch cable kit
A small shop rag
Tire gauge
Small LED flash light
Small metric tool roll
Zip ties
Duct tape
 

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I'm planning my first multi-day ride, around lake superior, for this summer and I am wondering what you would bring along as far as bike supplies/tools go?

I have the following so far in my leftside saddlebag:
Micro air compressor
Flat repair kit
Set of micro fuses
Set of standard fuses
Set of Allen T-handle wrenches
Emergency clutch cable kit
A couple of shop rags
Duct tape ;-)
I like the fuse idea. Never thought of carrying those before, but it certainly makes a lot of sense. You might want to consider some type of pliers (locking) in case you need to move the clutch arm on the engine to change a clutch cable...unless you have some really strong fingers.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I decided to add the fuses when I couldn't figure out why my 12volt plug on the handlebar or the battery tender wasn't working. Took the side cover and seat off and found an inline fuse holder on the pigtail with a blown 3watt fuse in it!

Small vise grip added! Thanks.
 

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rule of thumb for me if I use a tool on the bike in the garage I put one in the saddle bad. Of coarse you half to decide if you would need it on the open road.
tire gauge
flash light
10mm wrench (put lock washers on your battery cables never come loose then)
zip ties
pliers
look for fold up allen wrenches takes up lees room
 

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Just bring a bottle opener...

I carry a complete tool roll. Can pretty much do any roadside repairs. The plug kit and either a tiny compressor or CO2 cartridge inflator are a great idea and the clutch cable repair kit doesn't take up much space and could really save your a$$. I need to put a little mag-lite in there...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
zip ties ! can't beleive I didn't think of that...
 

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Bring a leatherman instead of pliers.

I like to bring my Camalbak for staying hydrated. This one of the most important thing to remember when traveling.

A camera. The smart phone is great, but use it for a back-up camera.

Paper maps. GPS is good but a paper map will show you the BIG picture.

Rain gear.

A bike cover of some sort. I bring a nylon tarp. It can cover us and the bike in a hail storm or camo in front of the motel.
 

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I just mapped my Circle Route on Google yesterday. Relatively short distances over 10 days from July 4th - 14th. My wife picked up a "Lake Superior Travel Guide" from Borders. It's a supplement to the Lake Superior Magazine. Looks like it has some good info for planning.

On my first multi-day trip last summer, I brought some tools. Bring what you need to change a headlight. Bitch when they go out. Clutch cable kit is good (especially on 08 Kingpin if you haven't already broken the factory original). Have voltage regulator checked before trip. Mine went out after deluge of rain in LaCrosse. :)
 

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Bump. My wife and I were riding around a beautiful lake (at a very low speed after traveling about 100 miles in a couple of hours) when the gear shift linkage disconnected from the shaft coming out of the transmission. Luckily the needed wrench was in the set of tools supplied with the bike, but I was slightly worried for a moment (I have only added a shock hand pump to that kit and feared I would not have the tools I needed). I did not want to bother anyone on Christmas Eve to rescue us and we had dinner reservations.

Our XCT has 1,200 miles on it and was serviced at 500 by a Victory service dealership. I don't know how this part disconnected, because there is a groove where the tightening bolt fits that should have prevented the slip off. The bolt was still attached. My guess is that the bolt was threaded before the part was put on the shaft, so it would have been barely attached.

I have read many post on this forum in the last couple of months, but had not gone far enough back to see this one about what tools to always carry. I will be adding a few more tools to my saddlebag. Cell phones are limited to coverage areas and if you stay in those areas, you are missing out.

After making the repair quickly, the motorcycle was difficult to start. It did start after about a minute of wishful thinking and cranking a few times. I gave my wife the signal that I was ready for her to climb on. As she approached and asked what was wrong, I confidently stated "vapor lock". She shrugged her shoulders, climbed on and we were on our way. I have somehow convinced her that I often know what I am talking about. As long as she doesn't worry, we are good.

I then told her about the forum I read about long ride in heavy traffic, followed by a short stop. That was similar to what we had just done. She now understands my time reading about your experiences is not waisted.

Thank you all for sharing. I am continuing to learn what I need to truly enjoy our time on this bike.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.


Sent from Motorcycle.com App
 

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Tools? Who needs friggin tools? :D

I have always carried various tools, tire repair kit, fuses, bulbs, etc, etc. The last time I ever had to use any of them on my own scoot was in 1976 when I was riding a Triumph Bonneville.

I have used them a couple times since to help out other bikers tho.

Guess I've been lucky (touch wood).
 

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A good real life example of why we need to think about things before we need them. Thanks for sharing

I'd also recommend adding a small pair of vice grips. They can be used as pliers but can also be used as a brake/clutch lever as well. And a roll of electrical tape.
 

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That which you do not bring, you will need. ;)
 

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Mobile phone preferably w/GPS. No kidding.
Motorcycle towing coverage. No kidding.

A few lesser known but handy items:

At least two white garbage bags, one for garbage, one for placing parts and tools in or on during repair on road. There's a zillion uses for bags. Once onboard you'll see.

A small stiff bristle brush like a parts cleaning type. It's not necessary but can be useful, plus you can wrap a few feet of duct tape around the handle and a few feet of duct tape is everything.

About 10 feet of tie wire (PVC coated will not rust) can be coiled up into a small pkg and having it on a run will make you somebodys hero.
 

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I carry a few small tools: $4.00 metric tool kit, emergency clutch cable, adj. end wrench so I don't scratch chrome, foldable allen wrench set, couple screw drivers. The only one I've ever needed for my bike is the Adj. end wrench when my mirror got bumped. I have used them a few times on some other American made bikes though like SilvrT. So I guess they are good to have along.
 

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As Pop said A phone and anybody's road side assistants. 2nd most important... water...
3rd believe it or not... TOILET PAPER.

Trust me, you want the second 2 in the middle of nowhere waiting on the truck, particularly if you have an SO riding with you.

My rule of thumb is past duck tape, zip ties and a leatheman, if your not a mechanic, forget about it.
 
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