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Discussion Starter #1
Searched archive for threads addressing the air shock (CCT). Was looking at threads... somebody made up a airline extension and routed it forward so the fitting was accessible without removing the side cover. Anybody have experience with relocating the schrader valve connection. How long of hose? I've got the little Fox hand pump. Seems it takes about 1740 (+/-) strokes :confused: to make a measurable difference in pressure. Yesterday I purchased a 12 volt mini air pump with built in gauge - 100 psi max pressure - to see if that works better than the hand pump. Will experiment later today.

Thoughts and opinions requested. Thanks. Dennis
 

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It sounds like something is either wrong with your pump or it isn't getting a good connection to the valve. The shocks pump up quick with the hand pump usually.

The marketplace is called the "classifieds". You can see the link at the top left of the Active Topics page. Probably other pages too.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Took my hand pump to three different bicycle shops yesterday. I asked each one to test my pump. They all hooked it to a bike with air shock (much smaller volume). They said the pump works as designed. I don't have any other motorcycle air shock to compare pump function so I don't know what "normal" function is when it comes to inflating the Vic shock with hand pump. Thanks for the feedback.
 

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I had the same problem you have. I had the $70 vic pump and I would pump that thing 20 times and would only get about 5 psi out of it and then I would lose that 5 psi unscrewing it from the valve. Used my sons $4 bicycle pump and 2 or 3 pumps and Im up to 45 psi. Works great and I took the vic pump back to the dealer. Im actually glad it didnt work.
 

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Searched archive for threads addressing the air shock (CCT). Was looking at threads... somebody made up a airline extension and routed it forward so the fitting was accessible without removing the side cover. Anybody have experience with relocating the schrader valve connection. How long of hose? I've got the little Fox hand pump. Seems it takes about 1740 (+/-) strokes :confused: to make a measurable difference in pressure. Yesterday I purchased a 12 volt mini air pump with built in gauge - 100 psi max pressure - to see if that works better than the hand pump. Will experiment later today.

Thoughts and opinions requested. Thanks. Dennis
Contact member Wspollack he did a nice schrader relocate.
 

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Luvmyride did that mod, looks good and is actually quite handy without having to remove the side cover every time.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I guess I need a lesson on how to contact folks on here. How do you find member names or alias so one can send a PM.

I tested the 12v mini air compressor on a bicycle tire. It works quite well. 0 to 50 psi in about a minute +/- for that amount of volume.

A couple days before; when using the Fox pump, and after considerable effort, the gauge would read about 25-30 :cool:. I put a different dial gauge with 10" hose (?) and would read about 50. I didn't really know what the pressure was. Before I stuck the 12v mini on there I checked the pressure with the simple old school pencil style gauge. It reads 60. Two or three quick checks each read 60. I'm leaving it as is for now. Will check the pressure again in a week or so.
 

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if they respond on the site you can click on their names otherwise you'll probably have to ask the site administrator how to contact them.
 

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Click on the persons name and choose "Send a private message to xxxxx".

You can also go into messaging via UserCP and type the persons forum name in to the "To" section. It must be spelled correctly and is case sensitive.
 

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Click on Victory Cross Country and Cross Roads
Click on Search This Forum
Look for the User Name block
Enter the users name and click submit
Open one of the users posts and click on his name
Click on Send PM

This will get you into the users PM. Draft / submit your message. Once he responds you should get a notification.
 

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Sorry I missed this initially. I was out of town for the last week or so, and in any case that "marketplace" subject might have caused me to overlook this thread. Here goes...

1) As ostbob pointed out last week in this thread, I did a write-up on my work in relocating that shock fill-point. Having to remove the side cover to adjust air is, IMHO, a dumb design; this is particularly true if: A) you have to (or should) do this adjustment often, e.g., if you ride a lot both solo and two-up, and; B) you have an XCT, which model puts bag guards and passenger mini-footboard supports in the way of a straight-out side-cover removal.

In that write-up, I also reference some threads here: one is a thread I started over a year ago, in which I started asking questions about how the stock line was connected to the shock, and one shortly after that, in which Mike "MTVic" picked up the ball and actually first did this.

My modified version of his work is probably too weird for most folks, as it involves drilling through the side cover and also tapping a Schrader valve (for the external dimensions of another Schrader valve thread, and which tap is not readily available). However, I'm satisfied -- prefer -- the access provided by my method, but that's me.

In any event, here are the links:

a) My web write-up, which has a lot of parts links and pictures that I think you'll find useful, even if you don't use my method: http://www.billanddot.com/shock-valve-relocation.html

b) My thread starting this discussion, because I was dissatisfied with the stock system: http://www.victoryforums.com/showthread.php?t=58698

c) MTVic's thread on actually doing this relocation work (in an area behind the engine, and a lot of folks have followed that procedure, on both sides of the bike): http://www.victoryforums.com/showthread.php?t=59042

2) If you have to pump so many strokes, as others have suggested I think you need a new pump or a new shock. I would stay away from any electrically driven or compressed air pump -- i.e., I'd use only a hand pump -- because you can easily damage, I've read, the shock that way.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
thanks for the feedback . . .

Thanks for the info! I did purchase a 12v mini air compressor a few days ago, but have not used it on the air shock. I did try it on bicycle tires just to get an idea of how it works (and it works quite well). I just don't get the feel of the little Fox hand pump. Seems like wa-aay to much effort for so little result. The bike shops that tested it said it works, but thinking about it they just connected it to a bike's air shock that was already pumped up. The gauge worked so I'm thinking they presumed the pump works. I'm not convinced. When I was using it, it read something like 25 psi. Other gauges read 50. My little pencil gauge read 60. So, which one do I believe. I'm okay purchasing another hand pump but need to find one without the locking gizmo on the end just to ensure there is room to secure it to the OEM air valve arrangement.
Again - the reason I was wondering about relocating the connection for the convenience of checking/adjusting without removing the side cover. Have an appointment in a few weeks with the dealer for some other goodies. Will have them check the air shock to determine what is, and what isn't. I'll read up on the attached links. Thanks for the info! Dennis
 

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Thanks for the info! I did purchase a 12v mini air compressor a few days ago, but have not used it on the air shock. I did try it on bicycle tires just to get an idea of how it works (and it works quite well). I just don't get the feel of the little Fox hand pump. Seems like wa-aay to much effort for so little result. The bike shops that tested it said it works, but thinking about it they just connected it to a bike's air shock that was already pumped up. The gauge worked so I'm thinking they presumed the pump works. I'm not convinced. When I was using it, it read something like 25 psi. Other gauges read 50. My little pencil gauge read 60. So, which one do I believe. I'm okay purchasing another hand pump but need to find one without the locking gizmo on the end just to ensure there is room to secure it to the OEM air valve arrangement.
Again - the reason I was wondering about relocating the connection for the convenience of checking/adjusting without removing the side cover. Have an appointment in a few weeks with the dealer for some other goodies. Will have them check the air shock to determine what is, and what isn't. I'll read up on the attached links. Thanks for the info! Dennis
You're welcome. I try to make myself useful, as I've gotten a lot of help here, too, on the forums in the three years I've owned my XCT.

Some air pressure notes:

- I have a lot of pressure gauges (see attached pic, for some of them) and over the years have been migrating from dial types to digital ones. Most digital gauges these days claim 1% accuracy, while dial types generally claim 2% or worse accuracy (unless you spend several hundred dollars, in which case you can also buy digital gauges that claim 0.5% accuracy).

My digital gauges always agree with each other, or at most are 1 PSI different. That includes my most recent gauge, a TPMS from Doran Mfg. (see my webBikeWorld write-up, if interested, at http://www.webbikeworld.com/r5/doran-tpms/review.htm ).

These gauges are from different manufacturers, so that seems to lend credence to their accuracy. OTOH, I have no knowledge that the manufacturer of the internal sensor is actually made by different companies; I doubt it, given all the digital gauges I have, but it's possible that there's a common supplier (which would make my all-agreed-on-a-value observation not very meaningful).

- Don't forget that you will lose a few PSI every time you merely check the pressure in the shock, if you use a gauge with a hose attached. That's because pressurizing the gauge's hose for a reading takes a good percentage of the small volume of air away from the shock's hose and body. That is, doing a pressure check on something with a large volume of air, e.g., a tire on your car, doesn't cost the tire much of a percentage of its air... but this is not the case with the shock and its external tube run.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Good Stuff!

Thanks again... for the clarification on all matters associated.

I have three dial gauges; two with hoses (different vendors) and one stubby such as the little one shown in your photo. I have no experience with digital gauges. For no particular reason I just felt a mechanical device was as good as anything. After this exercise, I suspect not. I'll check the pressure again tomorrow with the pencil gauge to see if anything has changed in the past few days. Next time I get to town I'll shop for another hand pump, and a little digital gauge. Thanks, again. Dennis

P.S. referencing your previous threads; I rode a Valkyrie for fifteen years, so I speak that language, too.
 

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Thanks again... for the clarification on all matters associated.

I have three dial gauges; two with hoses (different vendors) and one stubby such as the little one shown in your photo. I have no experience with digital gauges. For no particular reason I just felt a mechanical device was as good as anything. After this exercise, I suspect not. I'll check the pressure again tomorrow with the pencil gauge to see if anything has changed in the past few days. Next time I get to town I'll shop for another hand pump, and a little digital gauge. Thanks, again. Dennis

P.S. referencing your previous threads; I rode a Valkyrie for fifteen years, so I speak that language, too.
Ugh, pencil gauges are generally the least accurate. I've spoken with Lee Parks at various rallys. He teaches a course called Total Control Advanced Riding Clinic -- which I've taken, with him as the instructor -- and he also sells some nice gloves and other things. One of those are pencil gauges, and he claims that they test each one individually for accuracy, and chuck the rejects; I don't think you'll find that level of concern regarding most pencil-gauge suppliers.

That's a long time on a Valk! I had my Interstate for seven years. Magnificent bike.

After that period, and as I got older -- aging knees, especially -- I wanted something that was a little lower, let my feet go forward more, and was fuel-injected... so I rode a Burgman 650 for five years (and then got the XCT, which perhaps surprisingly is significantly lower).
 

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I bought the extension hose off of amazon months ago and still have not got around to putting it on. Plan on hooking it up to the plastic mount on the left side of the bike. I would think with the extension that you would need to bump up your PSI numbers to account for the air that is in the extended hose but not sure by how much. I would think at least 5 psi.
 

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I bought the extension hose off of amazon months ago and still have not got around to putting it on. Plan on hooking it up to the plastic mount on the left side of the bike. I would think with the extension that you would need to bump up your PSI numbers to account for the air that is in the extended hose but not sure by how much. I would think at least 5 psi.
I'm not nor never have been an engineer (and never even played one on TV), but I'm inclined to disagree with you, re the extra pressure. It seems to me that when you're setting pressure at your soon-to-be-relocated fill point, the gauge will still be reading the pumped pressure throughout the length of added tubing, stock tubing, and shock itself. That is, in my opinion, it doesn't matter if you add ten more feet of tubing, if you're pumping and looking at the gauge readout, what you see is what you get, anywhere in that closed system. Put another way, I'll grant you that the total volume of air in the enhanced system will be greater than before to achieve a given pressure reading, but the reading at the pump gauge will still reflect the pressure everywhere in the new system.

Given that extra volume, I suppose that there is more air that can be compressed, when going over a bump, but I think the compression will still be uniform, i.e., as before. I'm guessing -- now that I think about it some more -- that this is probably what you're talking about. Interesting question, though.

That's what I think, anyway, FWIW, etc.
 

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I think your probably right. I was in the mindset of added volume and not pressure which should still be the same.
 
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