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Discussion Starter #1
G'day all. My cheapo fix for a worn through RHS saddlebag latch.

Square section mild steel tube, hacksaw, drill, small flat file, metal filled epoxy (I used a Devcon product) and an hour of spare time. So far its lasted about 3 1/2 years and 60000 kms, including a lot of rough dirt roads, with no sign of breaking loose.

Image of repaired latch and raw material below. If its not clear, I can add more images and a bit more step by step detail.
Cheers, Steve
 

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Yes, please add more detail. Did you replace a piece of the latch mechanism with a fabricated piece of square stock? If so, how does the latch mechanism come apart and go back together.
 

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Looks pretty robust to me. The OEM latch is a soft metal that wears away when the lid hoop rubs on it. Lots of us have taken to moving ot slightly bending the hoop so it no longer rubs. Only the right side is affected due to the latch being the opposite direction than the left side (same latch used on both sides, one is backwards).
 

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That looks like a lot of work. I still need to do the fix on my bike.
 

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That looks like a lot of work. I still need to do the fix on my bike.
I agree, he is taking the long way around the block with that mod. Easier, is bending the wire bail forward CAREFULLY and/or drilling the mounting holes in it larger to allow movement. To check for clearance, place a flashlight in the case and slowly lower the lid and watch where the two parts engage. Then pop the paper clip on when you got it right.
 

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I agree, he is taking the long way around the block with that mod. Easier, is bending the wire bail forward CAREFULLY and/or drilling the mounting holes in it larger to allow movement. To check for clearance, place a flashlight in the case and slowly lower the lid and watch where the two parts engage. Then pop the paper clip on when you got it right.
Okay flashlight sounds simple enough. I was wondering how you tell you adjusted it right. I'll try to remember this project for when we leave the freezer. Single digit temperatures for Indianapolis Monday Tuesday next week. :(
 

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I've read some placing one or possibly 2 stainless washers between the latch and the lid on one side. Doing this shims/tilts the latch so the wire catch has room. I myself did not do it this way because there is a water seal between the latch and the lid. I didn't want any possible gap to let water in. I guess you can replace the seal with a thicker one if you choose.

I ended up bending another one from i believe 1/8" round stock. Welded on longer piece and moved the new elongated holes about 1/8".

For fine tuning that i put my cellphone in the bag, turned it on video, turned on the recording light and opened up the bad and closing the bag slowly about 5 times. Then watched my own video and adjusted accordingly. Repeat video-adjusting until satisfied.
 

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For fine tuning that i put my cellphone in the bag, turned it on video, turned on the recording light and opened up the bad and closing the bag slowly about 5 times. Then watched my own video and adjusted accordingly. Repeat video-adjusting until satisfied.
What a clever idea RC...thanks for that. Now I know how to find out if the refrigerator light goes out when I close the door. That has been a life-long mystery. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It's worth logging on tonight! Roadcouch, what a great idea with using the phone. Ricz, what a great bit of lateral thinking to apply it to the fridge; I've lost sleep thinking about that little light. I live off the grid on stand alone solar so I do worry about every bit of reducible electrical consumption. Solar electricity is expensive!
Back to the latch, I had to do something like this. My first idea that there was a problem was when the die cast alloy loop on the latch wore completely through and the lid flipped open at 130 kph. Wish I'd known about the paperclip preventative.
It was still under warranty, but the Brisbane Vic shop said they couldn't supply a lock barrel to match an existing key if they replaced the latch. Having two keys didn't appeal, and my hillbilly sense of thrift was offended at replacing all 7 locks.
Vinish, I'll post a drawing soon, but roughly, I cut off a length of square section tube, sawed one side completely off, then profiled two sides to match the tapered profile of the original alloy loop, leaving some protruding "ears" at the thick end.
Then on the third side, I drilled 2 holes, sawed and filed between them to make a slot the same size as the broken off original., filed and sanded it all smooth.
I then spread the protruding "ears" slightly to make a tight fit on the remaining latch body, then glued them on with the metal filled epoxy. A little bit over an hours work once you start cutting metal, with a lot of hours thinking it over first.
You wouldn't do it if it hadn't all broken, much easier just to adjust the wire loop on the bag body to prevent the wear, maybe add the suggested paperclip, but I wasn't a member of this forum then.
So far it's lasted well, the eventual failure will probably be the epoxy, but hey, I still have the tubes of it!
 
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