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The XR L.E.s have spoked wheels on them which makes it really hard to check the pressure and even more difficult to add air.
I was able to check the pressure in both front and rear with the Victory provided pressure gage that came with the bike, but could not add air with my compressor due to the restricted/tight access of the valve. I was able to add pressure to the front by using a bicycle tire pump, but still could not access the valve for the rear tire. The spokes cross in such a tight pattern that I could not get in there at all to add air.

I'm sure there is a solution within this group of folks so I'll just stand by and wait for all the great help.

Thanks.
 

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I don't know how tight it is but do a search on the net for a air chuck or try auto parts store.
I check my tires once or in really hot weather twice a month and get a good 15 thousand miles out of them.
Yes they loose air in hot weather I guaranty you.
With the price of tires I don't mind crawling around on the floor.
 

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Stop by Walmart or an auto parts store and buy an battery powered digital tire pressure guage. This will be much more accurate (+2/-2 usually) and will be much easier to use. While you're there if you don't already have a compact compressor buy one with an angled or 90 degree connection.

BTW the easiest way to get to the valve on the rear tire is to pull the right bag off. Since you'll have the bag off it's a good time to spend $4-10 and add a DIY Brukus to secure your saddlebags. Go to Home Depot or Lowes and buy 2ea nut plates and 2ea 2" bolts to fit and replace your front dzus connectors with them.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Stop by Walmart or an auto parts store and buy an battery powered digital tire pressure guage. This will be much more accurate (+2/-2 usually) and will be much easier to use. While you're there if you don't already have a compact compressor buy one with an angled or 90 degree connection.

BTW the easiest way to get to the valve on the rear tire is to pull the right bag off. Since you'll have the bag off it's a good time to spend $4-10 and add a DIY Brukus to secure your saddlebags. Go to Home Depot or Lowes and buy 2ea nut plates and 2ea 2" bolts to fit and replace your front dzus connectors with them.
Thanks for the tip on the guage and compressor. WIll pick those up today.

Not sure I understand the intent of the DIY Brukus. The saddle bags are held into place with the quick disconnect DZUS connectors...which seem to hold them in place just fine. What is the advantage to the idea you recommend?

cheers
 

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I recently came across this thread, and -- FWIW -- would like to offer a suggestion. I recently started using an extension hose, to both check and add air to the rear tire on my XCT. The particular extension I have is one offered by Stop & Go: http://www.stopngo.com/10-inch-mini-air-compressor-hose-extension/ .

This particular extension is:

- Cheap.
- Long enough, and not too long.
- Most importantly, it is both very easy to screw on and unscrew from the valve stem -- nice, big, knurled, female end -- and there is a fine depth of connection -- that is, it doesn't spew air from the tire, while connecting or disconnecting it.

I find this MUCH easier to connect to the rear valve, what with the disc and the belt and the bike leaned over, than connecting either a tire gauge or either a screw-on or clip-on chuck. Once you easily screw this on the valve stem, the other end is nicely out in the open, and you can use whatever you like to check or add air.

Scoff if you like, but I find this makes dealing with the rear tire almost a pleasure, and it's now a permanent saddlebag addition for overnight trips (along with a tire gauge, shock pump, etc.). I'm guessing that it work well on the spoked XR tires, too.
 

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... extension hose, to both check and add air to the rear tire on my XCT. The particular extension I have is one offered by Stop & Go: http://www.stopngo.com/10-inch-mini-air-compressor-hose-extension/ .

This looks like a great way to go... Am I right, in assuming the other end of the extension hose has a stem valve? so, it doesn't just drain air from the tire?
Right: the other end has a Schrader valve, just like the tire's valve stem, so there's no leaking. It's just like having a super-long valve stem (once you put it on).
 

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Thanks for the tip on the guage and compressor. WIll pick those up today.

Not sure I understand the intent of the DIY Brukus. The saddle bags are held into place with the quick disconnect DZUS connectors...which seem to hold them in place just fine. What is the advantage to the idea you recommend?

cheers
There have been incidents of guys having a bag fall off and bounce down the highway due to the Dzuz fasteners not being installed correctly. Also, at $1k per bag, bolts and nut plates are cheap insurance, with the added benefit of making the bags harder to steal.

Just us trying to save you a headache and some cash.
 

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That's why I got the TireGard TPMS. Was tired of crawling on the floor to read the rear tire. When Tire change time comes, gonna install right angle valves. Already have 'em.
 

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Thanks for the tip on the guage and compressor. WIll pick those up today.

Not sure I understand the intent of the DIY Brukus. The saddle bags are held into place with the quick disconnect DZUS connectors...which seem to hold them in place just fine. What is the advantage to the idea you recommend?

cheers
Keeping the bags. A few have lost their bags due to the Vic fasteners working loose. I kept and eye in it with mine and after the third time I found a pin backed out, I invested in the set. My .02

Ride safe.
 

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Maintaining tires!

My setup:
K & L 90 degree Angle Valve Stems
EZ-Air Tire Gauge by AccuGage
Husky Manual Bicycle Air Pump (Home Depot)
Once I get the tire pressure where I want it: Just take a look at the "Ride On LED Smart Caps". Saves my back and time!
 

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That's why I got the TireGard TPMS. Was tired of crawling on the floor to read the rear tire. When Tire change time comes, gonna install right angle valves. Already have 'em.
I agree and can't see how I ever had peace-of-mind without them. When I feel a little squirm on the road, I no longer wonder if a tire is going down. You may check your PSI before every ride, but I check mine anytime during a ride. It's been a law for cars since 2007.
 

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That's why I got the TireGard TPMS. Was tired of crawling on the floor to read the rear tire. When Tire change time comes, gonna install right angle valves. Already have 'em.
Ric, not trying to be a smarta$$, just trying to clarify: am I correct that the TireGuard system does not start reading out info until after you've started off? If that's the case, I'm not thrilled.

When I'm going for a ride -- just a day trip, or the start of a multi-day ride -- and it's been a while, I like to check my tires before I head out, (and, if necessary, add air). I would dislike having to stop down the road after, say, 10 minutes, when I'm no longer in my garage or a motel parking lot, to add air.

I've been reading TPMS web sites for more than a year, and there's always something that keeps me from pulling the trigger. Maybe they don't give a current reading in my garage. Or the display isn't waterproof. Or a losing-pressure alarm is not within seconds, or not loud or flashy enough. Or can't be powered by the bike. Or doesn't have a great or secure dash or handlebar mount system. Or doesn't have user-replaceable batteries. Etc.

Yeah, I know, I could die before all my criteria are met, but, to me, they're just not ready for prime time for bikes yet. IMHO. I do like the idea of having a sensor on the shock, though, as that value doesn't change much and I find taking off the side cover a ridiculous nuisance.
 

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Bill P.....
Simply remedy here...take a reading when you have returned home. Works for me. I have the fob hanging on the loop part of the case latch and will turn it on during the course of a ride. Then at the next stop, open the case and take a reading and turn it off.
 

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Bill P.....
Simply remedy here...take a reading when you have returned home. Works for me. I have the fob hanging on the loop part of the case latch and will turn it on during the course of a ride. Then at the next stop, open the case and take a reading and turn it off.
We have them velcroed on the bikes where there are visible all the time at a glance. It seems that the TireGard starts reading very soon after motion begins. To me, if it's down from where it should be, we have a problem and simply adding air isn't enough. People argue about their accuracy, but I'm only concerned with their consistency. 40psi may not be exactly 40psi, but I do know that if it was at 40 and now it's at 37, I've lost air (or ambient temp has dropped) I fill with a good tire gauge and then monitor with the TPMS. (people do the same with $200,000 cars)
 

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Velcro, eh? Thanks for the idea Pete. :)
 

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Velcro, eh? Thanks for the idea Pete. :)
On my XR it's velcroed on the small section of handlebar between the risers. It's easy to see and has never come off in thousands of miles of riding (without a windshield).
 

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Thanks Pete, I was wondering where you placed it.
 
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